Jump to content

Question about saving files with paint.net...file type, bith depth, dithering, transparency


Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

I'm a new user to this program.  It seems great, Im excited to learn it.

 

I was about to save a file and I'm presented with 3 settings:  bit depth, dithering level, and transparency threshold.

 

I want to save files at the highest quality possible, I dont care about the file sizes.

 

So...............  should I save with the bit depth of 32 bit, or leave it at auto detect?

 

Also, it doesn't appear that I can change the dithering level and transparency threshold (set at 7, and 128).  Should I just leave them the way they are?

 

Finally, it wants to save as a .png file.  Should I leave it like that, or would there be any advantage (or disadvantage) if I save it as a .jpg file instead?

 

Thank you and sorry for the absolute newbie-ness of my questions.  Not only am I new to this program but also to terms related to images such as dithering and transparency so this is confusing to me.

 

Thanks very much for any help!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you.  

 

When I try to save a (blank) file, autodetect is saving at 2.4kb, which is the same as 8 bit.  But 32 bit is saving at 8.2 kb.   But still, auto-detect is the one I should use for maximum quality?  Just making sure.

 

Also... thats very interesting about PNG vs. PDN.  In fact, I was hoping to use layers sometimes.  So, PDN is better for a picture with layers - it will save at higher quality?  And, later on, is it easy to convert to jpg or png without losing quality?

 

And I assume that I should not touch the dithering and transparency (set at 7 and 128), if I want highest possible quality?

 

Thank you!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

PDN is the native format of paint.net. It preserves all the layer structure and information. Use it to create images that you can open again and edit the individual layers.

A typical workflow has you save a master copy of an image as a PDN then resave it as a PNG or JPG.

PNG is a lossless single layer format which preserves transparency. Images saved in this format do not lose quality if you select auto-detect or the maximum 32-bit settings. Auto detect is particularly nice because it selects the most efficient bit depth (& smaller file size) while preserving the quality. I use Dither and Transparency settings to customize the image only very rarely. Most users will never adjust these settings.

JPGs are lossy. They lose quality with each save due to the compression of the data. They do not support transparency, instead substituting another color - usually white.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what EER said :)

 

Auto-detect will select the bit-depth that produces the smallest file size and doesn't lose any fidelity. It is safe to use.

 

The only reason I can think of for specifically choosing 32-bit is if the other software you're using the PNGs with doesn't handle 8- or 24-bit for some reason. (it happens)

 

Or, maybe you're working with REALLY LARGE IMAGES. In that case, using "Auto-detect" may be noticeably slower since internally it will save at each bit-depth in order to figure out the file sizes. (note: this may change in a future version, since I can probably parallelize this to take advantage of multiple CPU cores)

The Paint.NET Blog: https://blog.getpaint.net/

Donations are always appreciated! https://www.getpaint.net/donate.html

forumSig_bmwE60.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's worth noting that .PDN files can only be opened in Paint.NET; when you're ready to release a file to the world, save it in .PNG file.

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Irfanview will also open them...http://www.irfanview.com/plugins.htm

 

 

  • IMPDN - (version 1.16): allows IrfanView to read PDN files (Paint.NET File Format)

 

GIMP also. Apparently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow thanks everyone!!  That certainly answers my questions.

 

"Layers" were mentioned here.  That made me think of a follow-up question, regarding layers.

 

 

I'll be working on a project where there will be lots of different additions to each page of artwork... text in different places, little drawings etc.  All on top of a background which is a photo.

 

So, I was thinking that it would be good for me to use layers, as every individual aspect of the art can be moved, worked on, or deleted entirely, without affecting the rest of the picture, as long as each part has its own layer.

 

So, my questions are

 

1.  Am I correct in my understanding of what layers do?

 

2.  Is there any disadvantage at all (besides possibly file size, which I don't care about) to using layers?

 

Thanks!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll be working on a project where there will be lots of different additions to each page of artwork... text in different places, little drawings etc.  All on top of a background which is a photo.

 

So, I was thinking that it would be good for me to use layers, as every individual aspect of the art can be moved, worked on, or deleted entirely, without affecting the rest of the picture, as long as each part has its own layer.

Sounds like you're the poster child for layer usage! :) 

 

So, my questions are

 

1.  Am I correct in my understanding of what layers do?

You're exactly correct! I always tell people to think of it like old-fashioned overhead transparencies, all stacked on top of one another.

 

2.  Is there any disadvantage at all (besides possibly file size, which I don't care about) to using layers?

Absolutely none. Now, as I mentioned, very few programs actually open .PDN files, but you can easily overcome that problem by saving it to a file like PNG after you've finished the project. Just don't save over the layered .PDN file!

 

Which reminds me...

 

Irfanview will also open them...http://www.irfanview.com/plugins.htm

 

 

GIMP also. Apparently.

 

But web browsers don't.  It's not like you can upload PDN files to Facebook.  :)  Adding the IrfanView and GIMP userbase to the Paint.NET userbase still won't get it close to the number of people using the internet.  My overly-broad, sweeping statement is still mostly true: when ready to release to the world, use PNG. ;)

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very awesome!!  Thank you very much for your help.  I most definitely have and will have other questions, but I wont pile onto this thread anymore, they'll find their way into other threads.   :D

 

THANKS AGAIN!!!!!  extremely helpful.

Edited by mark88
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • toe_head2001 changed the title to Question about saving files with paint.net...file type, bith depth, dithering, transparency

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...