Jump to content

What EXACTLY does the "Xor" blending mode do?


Recommended Posts

The official documentation on this mode is frustratingly vague:

Thing is, I do personally use it to make art. I think if I knew what exactly it did, I could more easily create images that have eye-pleasing results when blended together using xor.

 

Any help or information you can give is appreciated!

i4dSYS9.png

None of these links are family-friendly, but they should still be safe for work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.mushclient.com/mushclient/mw_blending5.htm#blend33

XOR basically means "x or y, but not both." When the two pixel values being compared are the same, you get 000000 (black), and when they are opposites, you get FFFFFF (white). Things in between vary based on how different the pixel values are from each other.

@Anonymous If you don't have anything useful to say, don't post.

 

what I do all summer Emote Cursor Pack 'noob gallery

No, Paint.NET is not spyware...but, installing it is an IQ test. ~BoltBait

Blend modes are like the filling in your sandwich. It's the filling that can change your experience of the sandwich. ~Ego Eram Reputo

Link to post
Share on other sites

As pdnnob told it is and exclusive or operation on bitlevel.

 

So for each bit N in the 24 bit RGB triple

    compositeBitN = layer1BitN ^ layer2BitN  (0^0=0, 1^0=1, 0^1=1, 1^1=0)

Alpha handling is more complex. So I would use opaque layers only.

midora%20signature.gif
Link to post
Share on other sites

Alpha handling is more complex. So I would use opaque layers only.

 

Alpha is handled the same regardless of blending mode. Only the treatment of the color channels is affected by your choice of blending mode.

The Paint.NET Blog: https://blog.getpaint.net/

Donations are always appreciated! https://www.getpaint.net/donate.html

forumSig_bmwE60.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...