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david.atwell

DPI and YOU - Understanding Resolution for Print and Web

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Just wanted to let you know this great article is still doing solid work.

 

I've worked with images for about 10 years and I still learnt a few things from this.

 

And a mark of my esteem is that I signed up to this forum just to tell you this.

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In section 4, you recommend

But there are tricks you can employ. First, leave the drop-down menu in Paint.NET on "Best Quality."

 

Which leaves me confused because I can't find any drop-down menus (paint.net 4.1.5) that have a "Best Quality" selection.

Other than that, thanks for your great tutorial!

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29 minutes ago, Wayne D said:

Which leaves me confused because I can't find any drop-down menus (paint.net 4.1.5) that have a "Best Quality" selection.

 

It's first option in the Resize dialog; it has the label named Resampling.

resize.png

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On 10/31/2018 at 6:36 AM, One2CallAlex said:

Just wanted to let you know this great article is still doing solid work.


It has been nearly a decade since David Atwell posted the "DPI and YOU - Understanding Resolution for Print and Web" information, yet many of the Paint.NET forum members are still out of the loop about this subject. Over the years I have seen postings for help about the need to save a 300 DPI for this, that, and the other reasons.

 

DPI (Dots Per Inch) is only relevant for printing! My advice is to create your Paint.NET at least 1920 x 1080 for most purposes and worry about the DPI when running printer software!

 

Those who work with photos need to realize the average DSLR is ~16 megapixels, which is ~4920 x 3264 pixel image sensor about the size of a postage stamp. Image sensor pixel size ranges from 1.1 microns in the smallest smartphone sensor, to 8.4 microns in a Full-Frame sensor and is not stored as dots but as data. The image data is converted to a JPEG file at a resolution of ~96 PPI (Pixels Per Inch). After that it is up to the printer how that image will be transfered to paper or vinyl and this is where DPI becomes relevant.

Here is yet another video that I located that I hope will in the understanding of DPI vs PPI:
 

Edited by HyReZ
to add more nfo and clarification
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