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Resizing an image but keeping the resolution sharp


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Are you kidding? :shock: Paint.NET is nice, but it's not magic... Neither is photoshop, or any other raster graphics editor. What you're requesting goes against the laws of... Well, nature. If it was just text, okay, but this effect cannot be achieved if you ask me.

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Are you kidding? :shock: Paint.NET is nice, but it's not magic... Neither is photoshop, or any other raster graphics editor. What you're requesting goes against the laws of... Well, nature. If it was just text, okay, but this effect cannot be achieved if you ask me.

Really? To what are you referring? The resizing (doubtful) or keeping the resolution sharp so that it does not look blurred?

I have a lot to learn when it comes to image manipulation programs, however I find it hard to believe that just as you can shrink pictures and keep their sharpness that one cannot do the reverse. This is just a statement and not a challenge, OK! :wink:

So all that computer wizardry that goes on in CSI Miami, Vegas, etc. is nonsense!?

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Are you kidding? :shock: Paint.NET is nice, but it's not magic... Neither is photoshop, or any other raster graphics editor. What you're requesting goes against the laws of... Well, nature. If it was just text, okay, but this effect cannot be achieved if you ask me.

Really? To what are you referring? The resizing (doubtful) or keeping the resolution sharp so that it does not look blurred?

I have a lot to learn when it comes to image manipulation programs, however I find it hard to believe that just as you can shrink pictures and keep their sharpness that one cannot do the reverse. This is just a statement and not a challenge, OK! :wink:

So all that computer wizardry that goes on in CSI Miami, Vegas, etc. is nonsense!?

What they're showing there isn't the picture being magically readjusting... That's because they take a full high res picture, but only cache a smaller version. When they "enlarge" the picture, they're actually just zooming in like you would when you open a picture and zoom in to see someone's head or an object more clearly. No magic involved.

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So all that computer wizardry that goes on in CSI Miami, Vegas, etc. is nonsense!?
That bloody potato actually fools people?!? lol...

You can make nothing out of something, but you can't make something out of nothing...

There are algorithms that try to interpolate missing info when upsizing a photo, but I have never seen anything to write home about...

 

Take responsibility for your own intelligence. ;) -Rick Brewster

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So all that computer wizardry that goes on in CSI Miami, Vegas, etc. is nonsense!?
That bloody potato actually fools people?!? lol...

You can make nothing out of something, but you can't make something out of nothing...

There are algorithms that try to interpolate missing info when upsizing a photo, but I have never seen anything to write home about...

Do you think it's bloody potato? It's the worlds most watched programme! I won't take that statement to heart, I often wonder whether what they can do on their CSI PCs is , I still just find it difficult to believe it cannot be done. Can it be done any other way like for example taking a 7 Mega Pixel photo of the object and then playing around with it?

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The part I know is bloody potato is the fantastical way they manipulate images. Other than that, the shows are decent.

Example:

Pulling a perfect image from the reflection in someone's iris..."zoom and enhance"

 

Take responsibility for your own intelligence. ;) -Rick Brewster

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The part I know is bloody potato is the fantastical way they manipulate images. Other than that, the shows are decent.

Example:

Pulling a perfect image from the reflection in someone's iris..."zoom and enhance"

Gotcha, yes that is too fantastical to believe let alone process!

So I have a Sony 5.1 Mega Pixel camera, use the highest resolution when taking the picture then I could open it up in Paint.net and shrink it. Would that work?

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If you're finding it hard to understand, I suggest you look up Pixel (Wiki this). It's important to remember that a picture is made of them, and a small picture isn't made of very many of them. Your 90x90 image, for example, is only made of 810. A 360x360 image will need 129,600 of them, and it can't just make them up out of thin air. It does the best job of guessing it can with the limited information to make something that resembles the larger image, but it's still trying to make up 128,790 pixels based on the information of 810 (that means that every single pixel is telling 160 others what to look like). Imagine a game of "Telephone" (also known as "Chinese Whispers") in which you whisper something to 810 people, and have them all whisper it to 160 people each, then have all 129,600 people shout out the answer all at once. It simply won't sound anything like the original.

So, I'm sorry, but CSI and the like are playing with Hollywood magic in this case! :-) It's simply not possible to "sharpen" an image that's that small and make it legible. They've taken a large image, sized it down, and then shown the original one again as they complete the "sharpening" process.

Our other members should've been nicer, though. I apologize. :-)

Hope this makes a bit more sense!

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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That'll work fine...

Thanks for the confirmation! :wink:

If you're finding it hard to understand, I suggest you look up Pixel (Wiki this). It's important to remember that a picture is made of them, and a small picture isn't made of very many of them. Your 90x90 image, for example, is only made of 810. A 360x360 image will need 129,600 of them, and it can't just make them up out of thin air. It does the best job of guessing it can with the limited information to make something that resembles the larger image, but it's still trying to make up 128,790 pixels based on the information of 810 (that means that every single pixel is telling 160 others what to look like). Imagine a game of "Telephone" (also known as "Chinese Whispers") in which you whisper something to 810 people, and have them all whisper it to 160 people each, then have all 129,600 people shout out the answer all at once. It simply won't sound anything like the original.

So, I'm sorry, but CSI and the like are playing with Hollywood magic in this case! It's simply not possible to "sharpen" an image that's that small and make it legible. They've taken a large image, sized it down, and then shown the original one again as they complete the "sharpening" process.

Our other members should've been nicer, though. I apologize.

Hope this makes a bit more sense!

It makes a lot more sense and I'll do just that (Wiki)! Interesting analogy. BTW: not only will it not sound like the original, the whispered subject matter will not resemble the original even slightly. We did an experiment at school one day (many years ago! LOL) and there were approx 30 students involved and the teacher whispered a short story/message to the first pupil in line who then passed it on orally to the next pupil, etc., etc., and the last pupil uttered some nonsense which described a totally different subject to the original! :lol: Who said it was good to talk!? :lol:

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  • 7 years later...
Hidden Content:

I didn't notice how old these posts were, but it IS POSSIBLE, to take a small image, enlarge it, and keep it sharp.
 
All those files- JPEG, BMP, TILL, PNG, etc., are BITMAP files, and each PIXEL has its own inherent qualities which cannot be changed, in that type of file.
 
HOWEVER, in a VECTOR - type file, it uses  "text" type of system using lines and curves, to change the inherent mathematical qualities of the image areas, and, without a longer explanation, it works a kind of "magic", making the enlarged image pretty sharp.
 
It's not perfect, it can't take a postage stamp and make a sharp poster, but it is FAR BETTER than any other alternative, I have seen.
 
 
read below:
 
(possible spammy post removed) 

Edited by david.atwell
hid and deleted potential spam
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Not relevant.  Spam suspected.  Super old thread locked.

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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