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Can I create high res artwork with Paint.net?


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I've been using Paint.net for a few years now for online work for my websites, but I need to create some artwork for print.

I've been downloading PSD artwork templates and creating the docs fine, but when I add images I've already created or text, they have a fuzz around them. I have noticed that this happens when I create stuff for online, but it doesn't matter as it doesn't show up at 72dpi on an computer screen. When it's for print though, it's important.

How can I get everything looking crystal clear?

I'm defo setting up the page correctly as the size is correct and so is the dpi (300).

Many thanks

Nicola

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Are you setting the DPI to 300 and the size

in inches before making the image or after?

=============================================

Have you seen this?

http://forums.getpai...u-understanding

Hi there

Yes I am. It looks fine on the screen, but when I make a pdf of it, it then has this halo type stuff around it and you see it when you print it out from a PDF proof.

I'm setting teh resolution to 300 dpi and then changing the size to be the size I want. I work in mm, so the size needs 87x52mm, which means I use cm in the resize box. This changes the resolution to 118 dp cm - which is about the same as 300dpi. Its still hi res. Isn't it? (Just checking).

Any help, greatly received.

Cheers

Nicola

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You haven't detailed the steps that you use you add or convert an image to .pdf .

If you first save an image in a lossy format such as .jpg there will be degradation in quality.

By saving as PNG or Optimized PNG this can be avoided.

According to wikipedia, PDF uses both lossy and lossless filters.

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"Adobe Acrobat is not available as freeware. It can actually cost as much as your music notation software! A more economic alternative is, for example, CutePDF Writer. A drawback of this (and similar) free PDF software is that many settings, as described above, cannot be changed. CutePDF Writer installs itself as a "printer subsystem". This enables virtually any Windows applications (must be able to print) to create professional quality PDF documents.

Please note that, as an intermediate step, a distiller or printer will first create a JPEG of the document before converting it to PDF. Hence, as described for JPEG, printing a new PDF from an existing JPEG or PDF (repeatedly), especially in combination with the 'reduce file size' option, may result in noticeable loss in graphical quality; though often without significant reduction in file size."

http://www.myscorestore.com/news/article/view/id/103/creating-compact-pdfs-for-online-publication.html

This suggests that conversion to JPEG is an inherent part of CutePDF Writer's process.

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Do you bring in the image directly from a .pdn file using copy/paste?

Do you bring it in from a previously saved image?

If so, what format was it saved as originally?

I bring it in via Layer > Import from file

The original image is a JPG. But to be honest, the image is actually just text, so I could just type it straight in. I've tried doing this too, and it still looks pixelated when saved out as JPG or PDF.

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Using the Photoshop filetype plugin, yes.

Be aware that the plugin doesn't support all aspects of the .psd format.

So, always save your original, and save the Paint.NET edited version as a different filename.

(Don't overwrite the original.)

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Hi there

Yes I am. It looks fine on the screen, but when I make a pdf of it, it then has this halo type stuff around it and you see it when you print it out from a PDF proof.

I'm setting teh resolution to 300 dpi and then changing the size to be the size I want. I work in mm, so the size needs 87x52mm, which means I use cm in the resize box. This changes the resolution to 118 dp cm - which is about the same as 300dpi. Its still hi res. Isn't it? (Just checking).

Any help, greatly received.

Cheers

Nicola

Ok, here's something you should realize about resolution:

If the image was originally 72dpi (or created for web or for backlit screen), then it is what it is. You can't ADD pixels and force it to be 300 dpi. Here's a way to think of it: If you have a dog, and you say "Hey, dog, you're now a cat", and you can call him Cat all you want, but he's still a dog. Same thing happens with your file. It's 72 dpi (a dog) no matter how much you try to rename it 'cat' (300 dpi) and tell it it's a cat, it's still a dog. (72 dpi) You've not CREATED any new pixels. You will get heavy pixelation any time you try to print a 72 dpi file since that file was never built with enough pixels for print media.

The ONLY way to get a crisp, clear image is to re-draw or re-create at a high resolution of at least 300 dpi, at the size you want it to print. It must be built that way. You can't improve it if the pixels were never there to begin with.

And for PRINT media of any sort (signs, brochures, etc.) it must be BUILT at 300 dpi and size to be printed, or it must be vector art to get the best result.

Edited by Suki
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