Jump to content

Web Design Discussion


Recommended Posts

Perhaps I'm just a pretentious prick, but personally I expect a user to be familiar enough with their own browser to know where their bookmark button is. Expecting a website to automagically handle bookmarking a page is like expecting a city street to automagically initialize a car's turn signal if it enters a turn-only lane - it would be difficult to provide cross-compatibility for the large number of possible scenarios, and it's something the user should know about their own device. Bookmarking is a browser-level function, and, like the ability to change the style of the application scrollbars, is something a web page should probably not be able to do in the first place.

As such, I personally have never learned the syntax for bookmarking a page with Javascript. I did a little Googling, but the scripts I found (mainly variants of this one) used window.sidebar.addPanel for Firefox compatibility, and bookmarking a page like that makes it always open in the sidebar. Adding to its problems, I'm not sure if it accounts for Safari/Chrome, as only IE, FF, and Opera are explicitly tested for, and the browser detection they use is touchy at best - no browser detection method is foolproof, but generic services testing isn't historically reliable or future-proof.

When I come up against these sort of things, I prefer to use it as a teaching experience for users. A while back, I created a simple site for showcasing some work I'd done, and as a matter of principle I refused to use target="_blank" for opening external links in new tabs to preserve the portal - though it works, it's valid only in documents sent with a frameset DTD. As such, I left the links as they were and included a little pop-in box explaining the various options for opening links in new tabs or windows in a few different browsers in case the user didn't know. The site is here, and the pop-in link is in the second block ("What are my keyboard modifiers?").

It may not be feasible in your scenario, since you're doing this for other people, but if you felt up to it, you could possibly use a similar setup, perhaps with useragent parsing for more reliable browser detection, and include a short explanation with a screenshot of their browser version indicating which button they should click for bookmarking a page. Since very few sites these days have "bookmark this" buttons, it could help educate any users that don't know how, so they could bookmark whatever sites they wanted in the future instead of having to rely on the owner of the site implementing jenky Javascript.

One thing I thought might be a possibility, though it would be a perversion of the intent, would be to use a static XML document defined as an RSS feed with one entry that directs to the main page, as most browsers post-IE7 are set up to automatically handle links to docs defined as RSS feeds as bookmarkable items. However, browsers like Chrome which don't have inbuilt RSS handles won't work with it, and even if it does work, it'll be set up like a feed, so you'd have to do two clicks before you got straight to the page.

Just to test it, I set up an example of the XML-based scenario on this page as the last item in the top menu ("Bookmark Me"). I have not yet been able to test it with any browsers other than Firefox and Chrome, but, as expected, Chrome doesn't work with it, since it does not have RSS support.

I think it would be best to try and talk them out of it. If they insist, I'd suggest just leaving the IE-only script in there (inside of an

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

I am a web-developer and information analyst at a full service internet bureau. I have dealt with a lot of different website, both very big and very small, and none of them uses a bookmark button or link anymore. As Crazy Man Dan said, people are supposed to know what to do to bookmark a page. People who don't know won't do it using your link, because they don't know what bookmarking is.

What you can do is add "social" links instead of the bookmark link. It is relatively easy to include some js and html code and add all sorts of easy links to Facebook and mySpace or even add a "mail a friend" button. On my own website (in dutch, sorry) I have after each post a group of social buttons. These include a bookmark button, just to fill it up a bit, but if your client really wants a bookmark button, try to give him this solution :-)

That way the website is all 2010 compatible and ready to participate in the social internet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh look, this thread! How appropriate, since I just found this in my continuing studies of the art of procrastination.

I know the feeling! All you can think about is: who was the professional? Me or him?

It doesn't even stop at the design part. You could have a client who really likes the design and all designed features. Then he comes at the site building part of the project and suddenly the features should be different and bigger and "better". Other features are needed too! And if you won't do it, they complain until you get your own CEO at your desk to do it anyway. And, the best part, no matter how much extra's they want, they expect the website to be done on time.

But that has nothing to do with designing websites ;-)

I was wondering. Has anyone designed a website with a radial menu? Or a 3d menu? I see some radial solutions on the website, but not really fancy ones like you see in games. I think it could be a good type of navigation for user friendliness, but I am not sure it will fit in a website. technically it is possible of course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Guys,

Thank you for your replies.

@CMD: I love your solutions, but as this is a labour of love I'm going to take the cheap option and just remove the link. I absolutely agree that users should know how to bookmark if they can recognize the "bookmark" link.

Ooooh you do nice work - I checked the source :wink:

@ Pyrochild: Exactly! I'm going to be more proactive and deliver them the product - they can take or leave it but I'll only fiddle with it if it fits with the design principles and the amount of effort required.

@dntheo: I had consdered the social bookmarking option. I feel that if they don't know how to bookmark a site then these types of links will just be more wierdness for them to deal with. I'm taking the simple option :lol: Btw you know your site breaks in IE6? (The sidebar is vertically displaced).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... Btw you know your site breaks in IE6? (The sidebar is vertically displaced).

Thanks for letting me know. I don't use IE6 anymore so it's hard to check ;-)

I will fix it, naturally.

@mariodood456:

- The header image looks small, maybe center it or fill the space on the right of it.

- In Chrome I see a big empty space in the middle. I am working on a 1920x1080 resolution so that could be it.

- Below the main content block you have some whitespace. I saw I could scroll down to see the rest, but most users would think there is nothing more so miss the threads. People are lazy by nature ;-)

- I find the borders around the blocks are ugly. But thats my opinion.

- You have a scrollbar in your menu on the left. Why is that?

- The white on black looks cool, but it gives me a headache if I look too long. Maybe if you change the borders on the blocks to another color and lessen the number of borders, that would be better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could somebody help me with this? I have a table that I'm trying to center vertically, but it doesn't seem to be center when I view (I'm using IE8).

Here's the website: http://webpages.charter.net/apshredder

And here's the style sheet: http://webpages.charter.net/apshredder/StyleSheet.css

Thanks in advance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

center is for text-align. vertical-align takes top, middle, or bottom.

The problem with vertical align is it doesn't work well unless the parent element has a set height and the parent element has a correlating line-height. Since the body is a variable-height element, centering something vertically is difficult to do within the document flow. It's easy to do with position:absolute and position:fixed, but those are more for individual elements than the main site element.

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm using margin: auto to center my layout currently, and I'm experiencing a small nuisance. Some of my pages require scrolling (for most screen sizes), and some do not. As a result, the ones that do require scrolling are slightly shifted to the side, with the "auto" property trying to accommodate for the added width of the scrollbar. This causes slight inconsistencies between pages, and kind of bugs me (but not THAT much). Is there a way to get around this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, there are two ways to do it.

This way will work only in Firefox, but it causes a CSS error, as -moz-scrollbars-vertical is not a valid value for the overflow property in the CSS 2.1 spec.

html {
   overflow: -moz-scrollbars-vertical;
}

This way will work in any browser that doesn't have a persistent vertical scrollbar, but it causes a CSS error, as overflow-y is not a valid CSS property in the CSS 2.1 spec.

html {
overflow-y:scroll;
}

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't like the gradient background, to be honest. The logo is nice, though.

I do like the gradient. I do like my greens :wink:

The logo looks nice indeed. I would like to see what you will do with the content and if you will center the website or use a flowing layout to take the full width of the page.

This is a website I've worked on the last year. I didn't do the design, it's from a company called IJsfontein in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. I would like to hear your opinions though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a website I've worked on the last year. I didn't do the design, it's from a company called IJsfontein in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. I would like to hear your opinions though.

I'm not too big of a fan of the colors. Such a bright blue color as a background is somewhat distracting from the content of the page.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not too big of a fan of the colors. Such a bright blue color as a background is somewhat distracting from the content of the page.

I have to say it's a website for an amusement park with a fairytale background, not like Six Flags or Disneyland but more like the old fairytales. They wanted to give the website a look and feel of the park and even if I do think the design is ugly, it does give you some magical ambiance with the flash working.

So the goal is not for you to read what they have to say but to want to come to the park.

One thing they really want is people to make a reservation in their hotel or apartments. But I don't think you have gotten on those pages :) They are a bit hard to find...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...