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Paint.NET Internet Browser Discussion


Which web browser is most likely to create the next revolutionary feature for web browsing?  

92 members have voted

  1. 1. Which web browser is most likely to create the next revolutionary feature for web browsing?

    • Mozilla/ Firefox
      52
    • Apple Safari
      2
    • Opera
      12
    • Internet Explorer
      6
    • Unkown Party
      13
    • Dont care
      8


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Okay, since I found Google Chrome I can't stand IE. I love the bookmark interface, I love the automatic spellcheck, and I love the new tab setup, where it lets you see small screenshots of commonly visited sites for you to go to. For such a bigname product, it has a sense of humor:

Going incognito doesn't affect the behavior of other people, servers, or software. Be wary of:

Websites that collect or share information about you

Internet service providers or employers that track the pages you visit

Malicious software that tracks your keystrokes in exchange for free smileys

Surveillance by secret agents

People standing behind you

 

Changed the text in the signature yay!

PDN gallery!

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:shock:

...

Um... Man. I can believe I'm saying this... Internet Explorer 8 is really... pretty...

...awesome? Yeah, awesome. What is going on here?

Internet Explorer 8 was released on the 19th. I downloaded it on the 21st, and I played around with it today. I never, ever, ever, ever thought I would approve of a new IE release, much less be impressed by one, but I'm gobsmacked - it looks as if this new IE team actually cares about making a browser that doesn't suck.

The tab interface is significantly less bulky than 7, they removed the forced vertical scrollbar, but the most significant changes are under the hood: The rendering engine actually seems competent - overflow actually works! It's fun, switching between normal view and Compatibility View, just to take stock of all the little things they fixed. The whole Compatibility View thing is an awesome concept too - since everyone was outraged when half the Internet broke in the upgrade from 6 to 7 (the poorly programmed half, but I digress), they're now providing a permanent IE7 mode, as if to confirm what we already knew - preserving global compatibility with the mistakes IE has made in the past would otherwise prevent any real progress being made, so they made it an option to be used where necessary and moved on.

Another huge thing for developers such as myself is the addition of Developer Tools, an upgrade of the former "IE Developer Toolbar" that actually brings IE's debugging up to par with every other major browser - Firefox has Firebug, Opera has Dragonfly, Webkit (Safari and Chrome) have the Resource Inspector, and now IE has Developer Tools. The biggest problem I had with IE Developer Toolbar was the fact that it was just an inspector - you could only see the DOM in its current state. With the upgraded Developer Tools, you can make realtime changes to the local DOM to troubleshoot in-browser without mucking with FTP and resource changes. Plus, as if in a nod, they mapped the shortcut to F12, the same key Firebug uses.

The about:Tabs page has also been updated - while not as streamlined and functional as Google's "New Page" interpretation with Chrome, IE displays an uncanny sense of sophistication and design merit with this, and indeed the interface as a whole. If you've used IE7, you'll still recognize where everything is, it's merely more refined - exactly what an update should be.

I can honestly say that - while it certainly won't be dragging me away from Firefox - were I to be using someone else's computer, and the only browser they had was IE8, I could honestly stand to use it without feeling like I had to shower afterward. I really wasn't sure what to expect, but I am completely blown away by the actual progress the IE team is making. 7 was a step in the right direction, and 8 seems to prove that they're still moving that way, and with more steam than I ever dared to hope.

Good on you, IE team.

If you're running XP SP3 or Vista, go! Get IE8 today! The sooner we forget about IE6, the sooner we can make the web do cool things for everyone!

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

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haha.

i cant even find Internet Explorer on my computer.

Just Firefox, and chrome. and may i say.

Chrome pwns all internet browsers :D

You may say. But you would be wrong. :-)

Firefox is still the best, most usable browser I've ever run across. The plugins make it. Though with the recent 3.0 update, it seems to have lost something...

Still, CMD, I'm very excited that IE8 has met with your approval. I'll download it soon.

Yes, IE6 (and 5, which still has significant browser share) should fall into Mordor...

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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It's still not as extensible as Firefox!

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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How can you argue with Chrome?

Any browser that doesn't have extensions - specifically Ad Blocking - pwns nothing. :P

Trust me, I have Chrome - I'm a web designer, so I have a myriad of browsers for testing (IE, Firefox, Opera, Chrome, Safari, SeaMonkey) - and Chrome is bleedingly fast, but it's also stripped of features. It's a great browser, but from a total web experience standpoint, it's crippled (RSS anyone?). Now, I recently saw a blog about Google's announcement of upcoming RSS and extension support in Chrome, and once that gets out there and going, it'll be a lot better, but I've become so used to seeing the Web without the clutter of Ads, I simply cannot use Chrome for more than checking my GMail and managing my database via the online phpMyAdmin interface.

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

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Dan, we are again in agreement.

Only on Wii and Obama do we disagree, it seems...

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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Another huge thing for developers such as myself is the addition of Developer Tools, an upgrade of the former "IE Developer Toolbar" that actually brings IE's debugging up to par with every other major browser - Firefox has Firebug, Opera has Dragonfly, Webkit (Safari and Chrome) have the Resource Inspector, and now IE has Developer Tools. The biggest problem I had with IE Developer Toolbar was the fact that it was just an inspector - you could only see the DOM in its current state. With the upgraded Developer Tools, you can make realtime changes to the local DOM to troubleshoot in-browser without mucking with FTP and resource changes. Plus, as if in a nod, they mapped the shortcut to F12, the same key Firebug uses.

One thing i've noticed:

iz9a2a.png

I'm not sure whether this would make it harder to evaluate a reskin developed using IE dev tools. :?

KaHuc.png
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The blue line, you mean?

Yeah, it can get in the way, but you can click - click the Select Elements By Click button to remove the line. I'm just happy that the tool now relinquishes focus after you click! The old version would remain active until you directly deselected the tool. There were times when I was evaluating something in IE, switched to Firefox to take stock of it there, then tried to click in the IE browser window to set focus and bring it back to the foreground, and because the tool was active, it ate all my clicks, changing the inspected element, but leaving IE behind the Firefox window.

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

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He used IE's Developer Tools real-time DOM manipulation to edit the page. For instance, I used Firebug to change the title and description of the top board here:

pdnDOMination.png

I didn't actually change anything on the page, just the local copy that was in my browser. Once you refresh the page, it grabs the true output again, so the changes you make aren't actually saved, but it is useful for rapid prototyping.

The blue outline in his screenshot isn't actually on the Google page for that result, is the remnant of the Select Elements by Click tool that IE uses to highlight which element you have selected. I'm guessing he meant that Developer Tools' addition of real-time, in-browser editing is helpful, but the output is marred by the leftover outline, giving an untrue result.

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

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I tried it, but I found it bloated and hard to use because the ordinary stuff (Back, Forward, Refresh, Stop, Home) is sort of crowded out by all of Flock's extras. Plus, it wouldn't load Facebook (at the time). I found it worthless. But...well, glad you like it. :-)

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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I have now four web browsers in my Windows xp Computer. Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox, Flock. I were a firefox user and loved it. But recently when i close my Firefox and open it up again i have to re sign in websites, and the problem go on after i checked the settings. Then i had to look for a new web browser just as good as firefox. Thankfully i saw Flock and downloaded it right away. Flock really put a step forward in to the web browsers world.

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