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Which web browser is most likely to create the next revolutionary feature for web browsing?  

92 members have voted

  1. 1. Which web browser is most likely to create the next revolutionary feature for web browsing?

    • Mozilla/ Firefox
      52
    • Apple Safari
      2
    • Opera
      12
    • Internet Explorer
      6
    • Unkown Party
      13
    • Dont care
      8


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It tests whether a browser is standard-compliant by torturing it with the strangest things it can come up with that should result in something or other according to said standard - if the browser messes it up it fails

(right?)

Opera 9.5 gets 83/100 on acid3, it almost looks right (10 times better than Opera 9.25 anyway)

I would write plugins, if I knew what kind of plugins were needed.. :(

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According to IEblog,

Acid2 is one test of how modern browsers work with some specific features across several different web standards.

At first glance, this test seems simple. I think it actually offers a view into the subtle and complex world of web standards in a number of ways. Showing the Acid2 page correctly is a good indication of being standards compliant, but Acid2 itself isn’t a web standard or a web standards compliance test. The publisher of the test, the Web Standards Project, is an advocacy group, not a web standards defining body.

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The Acid3 test is a standards compliant test designed to test the rendering of a web page.

We've been over this, Mike. :P

It's not a standards compliant test, as it currently relies on technologies that are not yet standards. From k'Pedia:

In order to render the test correctly, user agents need to implement the CSS 3 Text Shadows and the CSS 2.x Downloadable Fonts specifications, which are currently under consideration by W3C to be standardized.

The fact that the rendering engines for Opera and Safari passed this test at 100% during their development means that they both had implemented two non-standard technologies. Non-standard technologies is what got us into all the horse hockey we're in today with IE.

Now, I'm certain these two technologies will be eventually standardized, but it may not be in exactly their current draft form. Look at Firefox's handling of the :before and :after pseudo classes (here). There was an error in the original CSS 2.0 documentation, which the Gecko people implemented. The standard had to be revised to work as intended in the CSS 2.1 revision (I don't know why they haven't fixed it yet - possibly because IE doesn't support it at all, so it's not a terribly high priority). Until these technologies are in fact standardized, I will continue to object to this test strongly.

Further, the test has already been found to have several bugs, which have been fixed as they were discovered, but which mean that any results given before they were fixed should be under speculation. Again from the k'Pedia article:

On April 22, 2008, Hickson again fixed a bug in the Acid3 test discovered by a Mozilla developer. This change possibly invalidates the previously reported scores of 100/100 for development versions of Presto and WebKit.

Basically, Acid3 is an acid test, not a standards test, that shows where the Internet is headed. Complex DOM scripting, AJAX, heavy reliance on CSS - these are all things that should be commonplace now, were it not for IE. That's why it scares me greatly when I read this quote (same article, folks ;)):

Microsoft, developers of the Internet Explorer browser, said that Acid3 does not map to the goal of Internet Explorer 8 and that IE8 will improve only some of the standards being tested by Acid3.

"Does not map to the goal of Internet Explorer 8"? It's a map to the goal of the Internet itself, so it sure a milkshakes better be your goal, or you're bigger idiots than even I'd imagined.

And this, happy children, is why I strongly encourage you to give the big middle-finger to Internet Explorer. Download Firefox, download Opera, download Safari if you can get it to work on your Windows machine - I don't care! Just STOP SUPPORTING THEIR LAZINESS. The Internet could to great and wonderful things were it not for Microsoft's languid complacence, and by tolerating their browser, you're helping them hurt web developers. Please, realize what you're doing.

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

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firefox is kewl i like it but wats so great about it compared to I.E?

  • [*:3omhzwrg]More Secure
    [*:3omhzwrg]Extensions
    [*:3omhzwrg]Themes
    [*:3omhzwrg]More Standards-Compliant
    [*:3omhzwrg]The Awesome bar
    [*:3omhzwrg]Access history from menu
    [*:3omhzwrg]Search history and bookmarks
    [*:3omhzwrg]In-line Search

I could go on...

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firefox is kewl i like it but wats so great about it compared to I.E?

  • [*:2jr8xvy7]More Secure
    [*:2jr8xvy7]Extensions
    [*:2jr8xvy7]Themes
    [*:2jr8xvy7]More Standards-Compliant
    [*:2jr8xvy7]The Awesome bar
    [*:2jr8xvy7]Access history from menu
    [*:2jr8xvy7]Search history and bookmarks
    [*:2jr8xvy7]In-line Search

I could go on...

You like those features, eh? I have been using them for some months now. The Awesome Bar, is that it's real name? Both CMD and you have used that term. Oh, and Opera's 'Awesome Bar' is more feature complete, allowing for custom searches to be placed withen the 'Awesome Bar'. The only thing Fx has the Opera does not have is extensions, and that is not even the primary reason it is not the most popular browser out there.

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Those were specifically reasons why Firefox is better than internet explorer. Also, I find extensions very useful.

The Awesome Bar, is that it's real name? Both CMD and you have used that term.

See this:

dot.life[/url]":l1mq3mqo]The engineers who collaborate to build Firefox call it the "awesome bar" and it certainly grabbed my attention.

Edit: Check your PMs

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Oh, and Opera's 'Awesome Bar' is more feature complete, allowing for custom searches to be placed withen the 'Awesome Bar'.

We went over this as well. You can right-click on a search text box in Firefox and select "Add a Keyword for this Search...", a flow identical to the right-click > "Create Search..." in Opera.

You're free to be a fanboy for your browser, but at least check your facts. :P

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

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You do know that it is the exact same process between the two browsers, the only difference being the title of the procedure. As CMD said, 'identical'.

I see no workaround in sight. Plus, with a name like 'Add a Keyword for this search...', I think the average Joe would get it, just as much as 'Create search'.

;)

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You may be correct CMD, but as we went over that is not exactly how that feature is meant for use. A clever work around yes, but not one that average Joe will come to learn.

Nah, I just didn't know how to do it the first time. Yes, you can create a search bookmark manually by stripping the address of the query field and replacing it with the %s character, but that was not the way it was intended. I simply never knew the feature existed.

And before you go touting superior discoverability, I didn't know it existed in Opera either until you mentioned it. I try not to make a habit of randomly right-clicking on search boxes. :P

I am not a mechanism, I am part of the resistance;

I am an organism, an animal, a creature, I am a beast.

~ Becoming the Archetype

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I think Opera will create the next revolutionary web browser feature. If I remember correctly, they are the ones who started a VERY huge revolution in web browsers: tabbed browsing! Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, and probably some more browsers all use tabbed browsing. This is truly revolutionary. I think if Opera could start a revolution the first time, they sure can do it again!

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