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Why not move Paint.Net to CodePlex


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I have read thru various posts and flames etc around Licensing of Paint.net and how the code is being managed. Would it not be better if Paint.Net moves to CodePlex and becomes truly a community driven tool?

Because Paint.NET is already helped along by Microsoft, it dosen't need many people to run. The only thing which Microsoft actually do with PDN is translate it, and that's all of which Rick can't do.

And, as I'm sure Rick has said in his blog, having more people involved makes it a hell lot more complicated, as if one person corrects something, everyone else who works on the code has to aswell. It loses time and money, that money being donations.

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Paint.NET isn't a community development project. It's my project.

I think you're over-perceiving the licensing "flames" around Paint.NET. The only people who had any complaint about it were Slashdot readers who don't even use the program. I do not believe Paint.NET would benefit from moving to a community-driven tool in the way that you suggest.

The Paint.NET Blog: https://blog.getpaint.net/

Donations are always appreciated! https://www.getpaint.net/donate.html

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Just figure I'd throw in my $.02

It just seems to me that it's worth checking out some more community driven development. I'm not saying to move the entire thing to that, but I think it would be an interesting study to create a community driven branch of PDN, perhaps OpenPDN or something like that, where it's just up on an svn server or something and the community drives some of the development.

I, personally, would love to see the comparison of the 2 products after 6-12 months and see if some of the arguments against community driven development, such as lack of stability and/or confusing code, really are worse in this environment than in a more controlled environment.

Like I said, just my oppinion on the subject. I certainly won't stop using PDN if this doesn't happen, and I still think it's one of the best graphics editors out there, and definately the best FREE one I've seen as far as being intuitive and user friendly. As I said, I just think it would be an interesting study in what actually happens with the 2 different development philosophies. Especially since PDN already has such an avid plugin community, which to me is kind of "community based development" already, I think this project in particular has some pretty good potential to benefit from the community far more than it could lose.

"You'll find that many of the truths we cling to depend greatly upon our own point of view."

--Obi Wan Kenobi

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Quite so. "Open source" means anyone can use it, not anyone can work on it.

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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I, personally, would love to see the comparison of the 2 products after 6-12 months and see if some of the arguments against community driven development, such as lack of stability and/or confusing code, really are worse in this environment than in a more controlled environment.

Nobody's arguing against community driven development. Paint.NET is just not a community developed project. Never has been.

The Paint.NET Blog: https://blog.getpaint.net/

Donations are always appreciated! https://www.getpaint.net/donate.html

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There's already a community-driven graphics program: the GIMP.

If Paint.NET was forked into "Rick's version" and "Community version," I have no doubt that in a matter of a few short years, the open version would simply evolve into a near-clone of GIMP, only written on the .NET Framework...

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ambigram signature by Kemaru

[i write plugins and stuff]

If you like a post, upvote it!

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Well,

When I see the copyright for Paint.NET it says:

Copyright © dotPDN LLC, Rick Brewster, Chris Crosetto, Tom Jackson, Michael Kelsey, Brandon Ortiz, Craig Taylor, Chris Trevino, and Luke Walker.

Portions Copyright © Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

And this is what "Credits" Say:

Version 3.2x

Rick Brewster

Project Lead, Programming

Tom Jackson

Contributing Effects Programmer

Zach Walker, a.k.a. pyrochild

Original code for some of the improvements made to the Frosted Glass effect

http://illusionaryz.deviantart.com

Microsoft Developer Division

Translations for Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazil), and Spanish

Version 3.10

Rick Brewster

Project Lead, Programming

David Issel, a.k.a. BoltBait

Original code for Ink Sketch and Soften Portrait effects

http://www.BoltBait.com

Dean Ashton

Original code for the DDS file type handler

http://www.dmashton.co.uk/

Microsoft Developer Division

Translations for Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazil), and Spanish

Version 3.0x

Rick Brewster

Project Lead, Programming

Tom Jackson

Contributing Effects Programmer

Microsoft Developer Division

Translations for Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazil), and Spanish

Version 2.5, 2.6x, 2.7x

Rick Brewster

Project Lead, Programming

Tom Jackson

Programming

Dennis Dietrich

Localization and German Translation

Version 2.1

Rick Brewster

Project Lead, Programming

Tom Jackson

Programming

Craig Taylor

Programming, Web Site Maintenance

Luke Walker

Web Site Design

Version 2.0

Tom Jackson

Programming, Documentation

Michael Kelsey

Programming, Documentation

Craig Taylor

Programming, Documentation

Rick Brewster

Project Mentor from Microsoft

Jack Hagemeister

Project Advisor from Washington State University

Chris Crosetto

Emboss, Relief, and Edge Detect Effects

Cpt. S. 422 Fall 2004 Students

Testing

Version 1.1

Rick Brewster

Programming

Tom Jackson

Testing, Documentation

Michael Kelsey

Testing, Documentation

Craig Taylor

Testing, Documentation

Version 1.0

Rick Brewster

Project Lead, Programming

Brandon Ortiz

Testing, Documentation

Chris Trevino

Programming, Design

Luke Walker

Programming

Kerry Hammil

Project Mentor from Microsoft

Ivan Lumala

Project Sponsor from Microsoft

Jack Hagemeister

Project Advisor from Washington State University

External Libraries and Contributors

TGA File Format support code adapted from the CxImage library by David Pizzolato, http://www.xdp.it/cximage.htm

#ziplib (“SharpZipLib”) library by Mike Krueger, http://www.icsharpcode.net/OpenSource/S ... fault.aspx

Squish library for DXT Compression by Simon Brown, http://www.sjbrown.co.uk/?code=squish

Some icons are from or based on those in the Silk

Doesn't really look like just "My Project"

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Those are past contributors. Just because someone isn't contributing anymore doesn't mean their name is removed from the Copyright line.

And what exactly are you trying to argue here? It sounds like you're just looking for a fight.

The Paint.NET Blog: https://blog.getpaint.net/

Donations are always appreciated! https://www.getpaint.net/donate.html

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Question answered.

Thread Locked

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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