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jake2k

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Evil, Devil Dan:

How did you manage to grow two giant, semi-transparent heads out of your back?

By taking the pill called PDN twice a day for 1 month. :wink: :lol:

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Evil, Devil Dan:

How did you manage to grow two giant, semi-transparent heads out of your back?

By taking the pill called PDN twice a day for 1 month. :wink: :lol:

Alright who played a joke on me? I was told that pill was a suppository not something to be taken by mouth.

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Alright who played a joke on me? I was told that pill was a suppository not something to be taken by mouth.
Ah! That's what's sticking out from behind Mario!

Agh! Agh! AUgahahgshgsahgahaaagggh!

*burns eyes out in most painful way imaginable*

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*burns eyes out in most painful way imaginable*

Acid maybe?

EDIT: to conform to the thread, I shall be posting a picture of myself soon with my high quality, professional and undoubtedly envy fodder 1.3 megapixel camera phone (cell phone).

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These camera phones are a bit silly really. It's all very well having a 5 megapixel camera-phone (they do exist), but 5 megapixels doesn't mean a high quality lense. That's why I'll be sticking with my Canon Powershot G6 7.1 megapixel Digital Bridge :D I'll also continue to use my film cameras too. :)

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It depends; are you talking about the additive or subtractive methods of color? In the additive method (light), you're correct - black is the absence of color. But in the subtractive method (ink), it is the sum of all color. :-)

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I knew that would come up...

Actually Rubrica is still right. When your talking about reflected light, the color we see "bouncing" off of an object is whatever light left unabsorbed by the matter. With the color black, the pigment of the reflecting matter has to be such that it absorbs all of the perceived color in the spectrum.

You are right in that with ink this state is only achieved by combining all color. However, idea of how the light is displayed, or perceived, is still the same.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black#Color_or_light_in_science

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Actually Rubrica is still right. When your talking about reflected light, the color we see "bouncing" off of an object is whatever light left unabsorbed by the matter. With the color black, the pigment of the reflecting matter has to be such that it absorbs all of the perceived color in the spectrum.

It depends on how you define a color. If you mean reflected light, you are correct; but if you mean perceived state, I am right. See, color can be defined in absolute terms, as reflected light; but in a more functional and practical way, color can also be defined (quite scientifically) as the perceived state of an object, which would include a lack of reflected light.

Besides, the article you cited says:

Black is the color of objects that do not reflect light in any part of the visible spectrum.

QED. :-)

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It depends on how you define a color.
Rubrica was basing his statement on the scientific definition of black. So, the portion of the Wiki article I was citing was the part about black's scientific definition.

Color or light in science

  • Black can be defined as the visual impression experienced in directions from which no visible light reaches the eye. (This makes a contrast with whiteness, the impression of any combination of colors of light that equally stimulates all three types of color-sensitive visual receptors.)
    Pigments that absorb light rather than reflect it back to the eye "look black". A black pigment can, however, result from a combination of several pigments that collectively absorb all colors. If appropriate proportions of three primary pigments are mixed, the result reflects so little light as to be called "black".
    This provides two superficially opposite but actually complementary descriptions of black. Black is the lack of all colors of light, or an exhaustive combination of multiple colors of pigment.

Anyway, Wikipedia is never the final authority on any subject, so I'll keep looking. :)

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And I was saying, it depends on what kind of science. In light, yes; black is lack of color. But in other branches of science less concerned with its composition and more concerned with the effects, it's a color. :-) That's why it goes with everything.

Take light itself as an analogy. Is it an electromagnetic wave or a stream of particles? No one definition satisfies all branches of science, so different branches of science use different states of light in their equations.

Definitions are like measurements; sometimes they suit us in meters, liters, and joules, but other times we just need feet, gallons, and ergs.

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That's exactly my argument! You CAN see it! :-D

EDIT: Whoops! I forgot that this wasn't in the overflow...

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