toe_head2001

TinyPNG v1.0 (March 4, 2015)

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TinyPNG

This is a save filetype plugin that will use the TinyPNG service to compress images. Requested here. TinyPNG uses lossy compression, while maintaining transparency and most visual quality.

 

A few things to keep in mind:

-An active internet connect is required

-This will send your image to a third party service (TinyPNG), and download a compressed version generated by said third party. You'll need to read their Terms of Service; especially the privacy section.

-You need to sign up for your own API key.

 

Real world photo comparison:

Your Mileage may vary

Left: Original Image - 204KB, Right: TinyPNG (very little compression artifacts) - 44KB

normal.png.tinypng.png

 

Spoiler

Example Photo Comparison

Original - 204KB OptiPNG (default settings) - 126KB OptiPNG (Palette option) - 47KB TinyPNG - 43KB
normal.png optipng1.png optipng2.png tinypng.png

Large Color Spectrum Comparison

Original - 259KB OptiPNG (default settings) - 36KB OptiPNG (Palette option) - 40KB TinyPNG - 27KB
c-normal.png c-optipng1.png c-optipng2.png c-tinypng.png

 

Download

:arrow-right:  TinyPNG.zip

 

Installation

1) Place both TinyPNGPlugin.dll & TinyPNG.txt into your FileTypes directory.

2) Copy and paste your API key into the TinyPNG.txt file.

 

 

 

Source Code

https://github.com/toehead2001/pdn-tinypng

Edited by toe_head2001
  • Upvote 2

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It is important to say (and should be mentioned in the first message of the topic ) that the result of TinyPNG is loosy and not lossless. That's the reason for the big difference in size. But if the result is loosy then people have to ask themself why they should use this format instead of jpeg.

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On 3/4/2015 at 11:17 PM, midora said:

It is important to say (and should be mentioned in the first message of the topic ) that the result of TinyPNG is loosy and not lossless. That's the reason for the big difference in size. But if the result is loosy then people have to ask themself why they should use this format instead of jpeg.

 

Right you are; I added the lossy information to the first post. The main advantage over jpeg is transparency.

 

Personally, I will never use this service in practice, because I don't like sending my personal images off to some third party. Same reason I usually don't touch Google Docs, Dropbox, and other cloud services.

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I'm always happy if the users get more alternatives if has a chance to understand what he gets. So thanks for this.

 

To be fair against OptiPNG you may add the results of selecting the 'palette' option in OptiPng. I would expect that the difference to TinyPNG will be quiet small.

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To be fair against OptiPNG you may add the results of selecting the 'palette' option in OptiPng. I would expect that the difference to TinyPNG will be quiet small.

 

Yes, with 'Palette' option toggled on, OptiPNG will output a file size that's pretty much the same size. However, the visual quality is very noticeable lower. I'll add a more comprehensive comparison table, so people can weigh their options.

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Confirming it's working, thank you very much!

 

Sure, some local alternative with similar compression results would be nice but I don't know of any - do you?

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Confirming it's working, thank you very much!

 

Sure, some local alternative with similar compression results would be nice but I don't know of any - do you?

 

But did you test with the 'palette' option of OptiPNG? It does the same as TinyPNG: Reducing the png to 8-bit colors.

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Have you looked at this website yet?
https://pngmini.com/lossypng.html

I first heard about Lossy PNG encoding there; you should consider taking it a look, if my eyes do not deceive me, then they actually have the Source Code available... which means it can be turned into a Paint.NET plugin instead of a standalone program, it would get better results than TinyPNG, and most importantly it wouldn't require an online service.

It can also do low-color paletted images that still contain an alpha channel... of course, it's not compatible with Paint.NET's native PNG exporting, but it is still pretty sweet none the less. (Can't wait for 24-bit images with transparency threshold, or alpha-channel dithering for transparency thresholds)

Edited by Amaroq Dricaldari

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WebP works well for many cases, but not for web. Only Chromium browsers (Chrome, Opera, ect.) support WebP.

Mozilla recently decided WebP was finally up to snuff, and will be adding support in the coming months.

As for Edge and Safari, don't hold your breath. Microsoft and Apple usually don't support non-standard tech unless it's of their own creation.

 

I personally use the PNG format, and encode the images with PNGGauntlet.

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On 3/4/2015 at 9:43 PM, toe_head2001 said:

Installation:

1) Place both TinyPNGPlugin.dll & TinyPNG.txt into your FileTypes directory.

2) Copy and paste your API key into the TinyPNG.txt file.

 

Please check to see if you have followed the install instructions properly.

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BoltBait is absolutely correct.

There is no API Key in the source code.

 

As for posting the source code... I guess I forgot to do that. I'll post it in the coming days.

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