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Theresonly1cryo

Need advices on Tablets (Microsoft, Wacom)

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I assume most people here, we're all artists, and one thing about been an artist, specially one that dreams to enter professional art industry, one will desire for a tablet. And when I say tablet, I meant touchscreen tablet. Not touchpad tablet.

 

So far, I only see two tablets that strike my interests

1. Microsoft Surface Pro 2 (Windows 8) Expensive

2. Wacom Cintiq Companion (Windows 8) Expensive as hell

 

The reason for needing a tablet, is of course, the softwares it offers, as we all know, we can do more things on a tablet than peice of paper or operating with mouse, such as hand made image editing, image painting, 3D modeling, etc. Right now, I am thinking about buying Surface Pro 2, as it is much more cheaper than Companion.

 

The thing that concerns me, perhaps the only concern, and biggest concern, okay, I'll get on to the point, is the fact that wether not Surface Pro 2 has the same capabiity as the Cintiq Companion, Cintiq is simply too expensive, perhaps there's a reason for the luxurious hardware and even more luxurious price, maybe Wacom wants their costumers to be professional artists in majority, wether not Surface Pro 2 can do all the things Companion can or not, that is what concerns me.

 

One thing I noticed among comments and opinions is the fact that Surface Pro 2 has very little pressure sensitivity, as opposed to the 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity Cintiq can offer, maybe this information is not entirely right, as I learned that pressure sensitvity comes from the pen, not the screen, but and again, I maybe wrong again, please correct me if you know what's going on with those pressure sensitivity facts.

 

One video I viewed on Youtube about a reviewer installing WinTab drivers on his Surface Pro 2 and allowing to become pressure sensitive, I had very little idea of what WinTab drivers is, but I learned it's a driver that runs the pressure sensitivity capability of Pro 2 so the function can be utilized or fully utilized, but then again, wether not it offers 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity, I do not know.

 

Some little facts about myself, I enjoy creating art as I speak and I'm looking to get into art professionally, my question comes down to wether not Surface Pro 2 is all I need or I should save up and go for the ridiculously priced Cintiq Compaion. Or, if someone know something even better, feel free to share!

 

Many thanks!

 

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Edited by Theresonly1cryo

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Hi there T1cryo - I will assume, because you are posting here, that you are interested in using a tablet with Paint.net?  Alas, PDN does not support touch sensitivity, therefore 'out the window' goes the tablet.

 

I recently got a Wacom Intuos 5, to try out with PS and, to be honest, I prefer using my mouse with Paint.net emoticon-animal-022.gif    

 

 

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Why do you need such a niche product?

Wacom Cintiq companion is definitely a luxurious product intended solely for professionals. It's a practical tool for graphic designers to do sketch and do their job on the go. Surface Pro 2 is similarly useless for a starving starting artist.

If you already have a computer, I suggest investing the money on a legitimate version of Photoshop and a Wacom Bamboo. It does essentially everything you need, professional products like Cintiq and Intuos have lots of additional features that are very useful but not necessary.

 

It's not about having all the best products, it's about making the best with what you have.

Altohugh I admit that there are instances where the quality of a product matters. Wacom tablets are generally better than other tablets, the pen doesn't need batteries and the response is a lot better, so is the surface of the device. Using dedicated software like Photoshop or Corel Painter for digital painting will probably yield better results than using Paint.NET. Not bashing pdn or anything I love it, but it's understandably not on the same level as pro software in all aspects... not yet at least. Your paintings will last longer and look more vibrant and better overall, if you use high quality papers like Fabriano or Hahnemühle and paints like Schmincke or Sennelier. However, if you're terribly untalented and untrained your work will look bad no matter how expensive your materials.

Edited by Kemaru

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It will take some time for you to get used to using a tablet. There are smaller Cintiq tablets that you can give a try or buy on ebay for a smaller price.  I never tried a Cintiq or any other  screen tablet, but I did heavy research on them and asked several artists who have been using them for quite some time, to find out that it's not like drawing on paper with a pencil. You will need to get used to it.

 

I've been using a pen tablet (Wacom Bamboo) for over six years now and one BIG con, you will have a harder time drawing traditionally. If you're thinking of using a tablet, do not abandon using pencil and paper. Use both methods. 

Edited by HELEN

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Hi there T1cryo - I will assume, because you are posting here, that you are interested in using a tablet with Paint.net?  Alas, PDN does not support touch sensitivity, therefore 'out the window' goes the tablet.

 

I recently got a Wacom Intuos 5, to try out with PS and, to be honest, I prefer using my mouse with Paint.net emoticon-animal-022.gif    

Hello, Pixey, I am posting here as I stated that I assume I can find artists here who have or are using a screen tablet on softwares not just paintnet, I was never actually interested in the Intuos or Bamboo, cause I don't think, touchpad tablets have a very impact, I've used it, and it doesn't go well for me.

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Why do you need such a niche product?

Wacom Cintiq companion is definitely a luxurious product intended solely for professionals. It's a practical tool for graphic designers to do sketch and do their job on the go. Surface Pro 2 is similarly useless for a starving starting artist.

If you already have a computer, I suggest investing the money on a legitimate version of Photoshop and a Wacom Bamboo. It does essentially everything you need, professional products like Cintiq and Intuos have lots of additional features that are very useful but not necessary.

 

It's not about having all the best products, it's about making the best with what you have.

Altohugh I admit that there are instances where the quality of a product matters. Wacom tablets are generally better than other tablets, the pen doesn't need batteries and the response is a lot better, so is the surface of the device. Using dedicated software like Photoshop or Corel Painter for digital painting will probably yield better results than using Paint.NET. Not bashing pdn or anything I love it, but it's understandably not on the same level as pro software in all aspects... not yet at least. Your paintings will last longer and look more vibrant and better overall, if you use high quality papers like Fabriano or Hahnemühle and paints like Schmincke or Sennelier. However, if you're terribly untalented and untrained your work will look bad no matter how expensive your materials.

Thanks

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It will take some time for you to get used to using a tablet. There are smaller Cintiq tablets that you can give a try or buy on ebay for a smaller price.  I never tried a Cintiq or any other  screen tablet, but I did heavy research on them and asked several artists who have been using them for quite some time, to find out that it's not like drawing on paper with a pencil. You will need to get used to it.

 

I've been using a pen tablet (Wacom Bamboo) for over six years now and one BIG con, you will have a harder time drawing traditionally. If you're thinking of using a tablet, do not abandon using pencil and paper. Use both methods. 

Thanks, I will not abandon pencil and paper of course, I just happen to find drawing on tablet a very interesting and full of opperunities alternative

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Yes, definitely give the tablet a try. Since now it's the "digital" age, you will need some experience in that area. Sorry I can't help you with which one to buy.

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Well, I have the Wacom Graphire CTE-440 which can be purchased on Ebay for around US$10-15 for the tablet and another $30-50 for the stylus.  I also have a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 GT-N8013 which is...considerably more expensive.  I can truthfully say, the two are VASTLY different experiences.  Neither is better, but they are not the same.  The Samsung is excellent for capturing sketches on-the-go, but even if it had a non-mobile OS like the Cintiq Companion I doubt I would use it for the full range of the creative process.  Size aside, the fact that it is mobile (and thus less stable in the hand) makes it difficult to work with.  Conversely, the Wacom (while it takes a while to get used to) is excellent at producing polished works, but I doubt I would ever use it on-the-go even if it were portable; it requires far more concentration to use.  I am intrigued by the Companion and the Hybrid, and will probably get one or the other eventually, but I'd recommend picking up the Graphire first and seeing if the workflow suits you.  It's a pretty cheap investment and something that's nice to have even if you don't use it all the time.

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The reason for needing a tablet, is of course, the softwares it offers, as we all know, we can do more things on a tablet than peice of paper or operating with mouse, such as hand made image editing, image painting, 3D modeling, etc. Right now, I am thinking about buying Surface Pro 2, as it is much more cheaper than Companion.

 

What makes you so confident that doing things on a smaller screen, such as a tablet, with less memory and less gpu power is an advantage?

I have seen so many "must have newer things" that fall short. When something isn't broken, why fix it? A good tower with the best equipment can outwork 10 tablets with a tiny screen, that you need to play with your fingers, or whatever else they want to sell. It's not even close.

I understand why the industry wants to sell something new, but if it's the same things in new colors or with a toy...who cares.

I do not want to network render. I do fine on my own without the eyes. I read your post a few times and began to wonder. Is this a new marketing ploy to get people to follow along. I don't follow for following sake. It began to read like an advertising story.

Edited by Visual

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Actually, it depends on what type of tablet.  If you mean a digitizer (like Wacom Bamboo and the like), then it's most definitely the way to go for creatives.  You just can't do that type of work with a mouse.  And it's not newfangled gizmo marketing junk, they've been around for decades.  Mice are good for the Internet, digitizers are good for art.  That's the way it's been for ages.

 

Now, tablet pcs such as the iPad...that's a potentially different story.

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What makes you so confident that doing things on a smaller screen, such as a tablet, with less memory and less gpu power is an advantage?

I have seen so many "must have newer things" that fall short. When something isn't broken, why fix it? A good tower with the best equipment can outwork 10 tablets with a tiny screen, that you need to play with your fingers, or whatever else they want to sell. It's not even close.

I understand why the industry wants to sell something new, but if it's the same things in new colors or with a toy...who cares.

I do not want to network render. I do fine on my own without the eyes. I read your post a few times and began to wonder. Is this a new marketing ploy to get people to follow along. I don't follow for following sake. It began to read like an advertising story.

I have a decent rig, I suppose I can wire it up with a touchpad tablet and work via that, but that's not the point, touchscreen tablet really brings out what I believe to be innovative art making

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Actually, it depends on what type of tablet.  If you mean a digitizer (like Wacom Bamboo and the like), then it's most definitely the way to go for creatives.  You just can't do that type of work with a mouse.  And it's not newfangled gizmo marketing junk, they've been around for decades.  Mice are good for the Internet, digitizers are good for art.  That's the way it's been for ages.

 

Now, tablet pcs such as the iPad...that's a potentially different story.

Thanks, I'm not slightly carrying any interest of the iPad, since it literally has no pressure sensitivity, not really designed for drawing anyway, and no support for full features of softwares such as Photoshop

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I have a decent rig, I suppose I can wire it up with a touchpad tablet and work via that, but that's not the point, touchscreen tablet really brings out what I believe to be innovative art making

What you just wrote may be the best of both worlds. It really depends where you think your own innovation comes from. Your idea, or a product.

I read that you use PS. If you have the other products such as AE you really need some heavy lifting to use it to full potential. I have yet to see any tablet that has the power for video processing and the effects. I render scenes and objects at 6,000 or 10,000 pixels at times. I think i would melt every tablet out there trying to attempt it on one of those toys. You need a lot of ram and gpu power. If, you just need a pressure sensitive screen for doing something like a real painting, and if its ok for you on a smaller screen, then who am i to tell you what to use. I prefer 25 or 27" screens.

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