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Westrock

When resizing, does PDN calculate from the original source?

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I was just wondering how does Paint.NET resize images when using the Move Selected Pixels.

If I scale a selection down to 50%, but then scale back up to 60% of the original does it scale the original by 50%, but then when I go up does it take the current image and scale it 120% or take the orignal source and rescale it to 60%?

Same with Resize.... If I scale a 1600x1200 image down to 1024x768 but then decide 1280x960 is better, does up scale the 1024x768 or rescale the 1600x1200?

Hope thats confusing enough!

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1) Selection scaling: Until you commit the pixels (you'll see "Finish Pixels" in the history window), it does all calculations from the original pixels.

2) If you resize from 1600x1200 down to 1024x768, and then back up to 1280x960, the resizing will be done from the 1024x768 version of the image. The 1600x1200 just doesn't exist anymore: you should undo the original resize at this point if you want it to base the resampling from the higher resolution version. (That is after all what undo is for!)

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OK, thanks! Thats pretty much what I was thinking. For static resizing I just tweak it and leave it, but the for image resize I undo and start over....just wanted to make sure I wasn't doing it wrong.

Also as a side note, does Paint.NET do as much as possible strictly in memory and not rely on the harddrive? For example often times I have PDN taking up 50-100Mb of memory. I just want to know if the speed of the HDD has any effect once the image has been loaded.

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The hard drive is used to store history data, and that must be written to relatively frequently. So yes, hard drive speed matters. Starting with v3.0 this data is compressed*, so hard drive speed matters a little bit less, but now CPU speed is a little more important.

* It uses standard NTFS compression. If you're still using FAT32 for some unholy reason, you won't get the benefits here.

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