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jim100361

Underwater Ruins

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In this tutorial we are going to go from this:

Ruin1.jpg

To this:

Ruins27.jpg

We will combine the first picture with this one to obtain the effect:

underwater.jpg

Note1: Elsewhere (in my gallery) I have a similar picture which has some sealife added to it. Since this is going to be graphic intensive, I will not be adding any in this tutorial.

Note2: In selecting my "subject" photo, you will note that it includes only a bit of vegetation (in the background). I intentionally didn't want to have to deal with hiding and/or otherwise erasing more than necessary to accomplish this. Additionally, it is also absent of heavy shadows which could detract from the effect we're striving for.

Note3: Likewise, the underwater view I selected had very little sealife in it (at least I was forunate enough that the selection itself had it in the left side allowing me to "hide" it).

1. Start by opening the picture of the ruins in PDN.

2. Select the magic wand and use 45% as the tolerance (as seen below)

Ruin2.jpg

3. Click on the clouds near the center, it should look something like this:

Ruin3.jpg

4. Next, select the eraser and set the Brush width to a very large number (this will permit us to erase much of the background with a minimal amount of swipes) as shown below:

Ruin4.jpg

5. Go ahead at this point and erase the sky:

Ruin5.jpg

6. Select the Magic wand again, and then click in the open area as designated by the arrow and then erase it:

Ruin6.jpg

7. Next, click once on the selection tool, then click somewhere just outside of the picture to deselect the area we just erased.

8. Again, select the eraser (and you may now change to a smaller brush) and erase the remaining portion of the sky as seen below:

Ruin7.jpg

9. If you didn't resize the eraser brush please do so now to the size indicated below. We will now erase the tree from the background.

10. To accomplish this, click on the magnifying glass a couple of times and adjust your view using the slider on the right and bottom to center the tree in our window.

Ruin8.jpg

11. Erase the tree and any other artifacts that may exist as shown below (again, using the slider on the bottom and/or on the right to move about):

Ruin9.jpg

12. You should now have something like this:

Ruin10.jpg

13. Next, import your next layer (the underwater scene). From the menus, I used "Layer>Import from file" and browsed to and selected my image.

14. In this example, my underwater scene is smaller than the ruins that I'm working with, so I will now resize it. Simply click and hold with the mouse the little circle on the corner and drag it down to the corner of our existing picture to make our picture fit to the same size

Ruin11.jpg

15. It should now look like this:

Ruin12.jpg

16. Next, on the Layers pane, click the down arrow to move this layer down and it should now become a background to our image of the ruins:

Ruin13.jpg

17. You will note in our example we can still see part of one of the dolphins visible, so next resize from the lower left corner of our selected picture and drag it further left and down until the dolphin is well hidden behind our scene.

Ruin14.jpg

18. Next, from the Layers pane, click on our original background so it is now highlighted as shown:

Ruin15.jpg

19. Go to the menus and select "Color Balance":

Ruin16.jpg

20. Move the sliders to the settings shown below:

Ruin17.jpg

21. Next, using the selection tool, select the background much like I have below:

Note: Please note that I have used the walls as a rough boundary

Ruin18.jpg

22. With our area selected, go into the menus and navigate to "Unfocus" as shown:

Ruin19.jpg

23. Use the value of 7 and click the "OK" button:

Ruin20.jpg

24. Next, with our area still selected, from the menu, navigate to and select "Brightness/Contrast":

Ruin21.jpg

25. Adjust the sliders to roughly the same settings as shown below:

Ruin22.jpg

26. Next, select the whole picture and navigate to and select "Unfocus" once again using 10 as our value:

Ruin23.jpg

27. Once again, in the menu and with our picture still selected, navigate to and select "Brightness/Contrast" and ajust the sliders as indicated:

Note: If you were worried about it before, you will now see that the background is no longer "glowing" as it was previously.

Ruin24.jpg

28. Next, from the Layers pane, select the underwater scene, duplicate it, and move it up to the top

29. Next, from the Tools pane, select the "Gradient" tool and "Linear" mode and sweep from the upper right to the lower left about 3/4 of the way through (if the dolphin begins to re-appear backup in the opposite direction until you can not see it - we don't want a ghost dolphin in our picture):

Note: This will give the illusion of the beams of light from the surface eminating onto our ruins as well as changing the shading a bit in the background.

Ruin25.jpg

30. Once again from our Layers pane, select the ruins again.

31. Navigate through the menu again to "Brightness/Contrast" and adjust the sliders once more as shown:

Ruin26.jpg

You should now have the completed undwater ruins scene:

Ruins27.jpg

Edited by jim100361
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Nice, i was hoping u wer gonna make de underwater bit yourself, maybe ill try itmyself if i ever geton the PC. But yeah excellent tut would have used it in an underwater scene in a manga but its discontinued now.

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it's a great tut, but I actually already like the outcome between points 16 and 17... if you add some bubbles, underwater plants and other fish, it would totally awesome already ;)

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it's a great tut, but I actually already like the outcome between points 16 and 17... if you add some bubbles, underwater plants and other fish, it would totally awesome already boltbait.wink.png

Thank You, as I stated near the beginning, " Elsewhere (in my gallery) I have a similar picture which has some sealife added to it. Since this is going to be graphic intensive, I will not be adding any in this tutorial."

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Nice tut!

Here is my first attempt. I was experimenting with alpha-displacement to get sunlight reflections on the ruins so the quality didn't turn out as good as yours. I hope to figure it out so that I can eventually get the quality of your pic with reflections as well. I will fiddle with it some more when I get a chance. Thanks again for the tut!

UnderwaterRuinsx.jpg

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I like what you did, though the effect I tried to present was a certain amount of "murkiness" from peering through the water itself and having sat at the bottom of the ocean for ions.

The foreground of your picture is a bit crisp for my personal taste, but it's still a worthy representation and quite plausible as well. The background is almost unnoticeable, which is a good result too. The further off in the distance it is, the harder it would be to see through the water.

Nice job!

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yeah I picked up on the murkiness idea but felt it made the image lack a focal point. Hence I took some liberties with the blurring and tried an alternative method so I could get more of a progressive blur towards the rear of the image.

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Being underwater and with currents and such would deposit sediments upon the structures and thus reducing the details of the ruins. This is why my preference was to blur it. I think a middle ground between yours and mine might provide a better result. Just my opinion, so please don't take offence.

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Being underwater and with currents and such would deposit sediments upon the structures and thus reducing the details of the ruins. This is why my preference was to blur it. I think a middle ground between yours and mine might provide a better result. Just my opinion, so please don't take offence.

Oh no I completely get where you're coming from. More of a realistic perspective. Where as I was going for more of an artistic perspective. I agree, a hybrid of the two would seem like an even more realistic result as well.

I did enjoy your tutorial nonetheless. It reminded me of a technique I don't often use for blurring and meshing separate layers together, so for that I thank you. It certainly was well written and, for me anyway, the point of any tutorial is to provide inspiration for the individual to add his/her own flavor to it.

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hey jim.. i think it might be better if you use the layer in step 20 and just flatten the image.. for me, the unfocus just makes it too blurry, anyway thx a lot.. :D great tut

Edited by stanleysoendoro

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