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Paint.NET as a screenshot tool?


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Hello all!

At my place of work, we need the capability to take application screenshots and annotate them with frames, arrows, and texts. We don't need anything fancy, it's not for publication but for bug tracking. We wanted to get something like SnagIt or FastStone Capture, but this was denied based on cost ($14 per seat...). I've already tested a number of freeware capture tools but they don't annotate well enough.

1)

Can Paint.NET be used as a sensible replacement? I'm afraid that it's total overkill... (I can't test this because it doesn't run on Win2000, but we are going to upgrade to WinXP soonish - yes we're at the bleeding edge of technology...)

2)

How would this work -- I do a normal PrtScrn of the entire screen and paste it into Paint.NET where I crop the relevant part and add frames,arrows,texts as vector items -- right? I'm concerned that the learning curve for normal staff is much too steep. All we need is a way to annotate screenshots, but Paint.NET can do so much more.

What are your thoughts?

Best regards from Austria - TorbenGB

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Hello all!

At my place of work, we need the capability to take application screenshots and annotate them with frames, arrows, and texts. We don't need anything fancy, it's not for publication but for bug tracking. We wanted to get something like SnagIt or FastStone Capture, but this was denied based on cost ($14 per seat...). I've already tested a number of freeware capture tools but they don't annotate well enough.

1)

Can Paint.NET be used as a sensible replacement? I'm afraid that it's total overkill... (I can't test this because it doesn't run on Win2000, but we are going to upgrade to WinXP soonish - yes we're at the bleeding edge of technology...)

2)

How would this work -- I do a normal PrtScrn of the entire screen and paste it into Paint.NET where I crop the relevant part and add frames,arrows,texts as vector items -- right? I'm concerned that the learning curve for normal staff is much too steep. All we need is a way to annotate screenshots, but Paint.NET can do so much more.

What are your thoughts?

Best regards from Austria - TorbenGB

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Hi torbengb,

Welcome to the forum.

Paint.net can do all you annotating - no problem!

To get your screenshots into Paint.NET try this little plugin: viewtopic.php?f=16&t=25897

[edit] It's not a plugin - it's an external program by the look of it. :wink: [/edit]

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Hi torbengb,

Welcome to the forum.

Paint.net can do all you annotating - no problem!

To get your screenshots into Paint.NET try this little plugin: viewtopic.php?f=16&t=25897

[edit] It's not a plugin - it's an external program by the look of it. :wink: [/edit]

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Thank you for the fast response. I'm quite sure that Paint.NET has no limitations and that it can do all we need.

But I am concerned that it is too much; too many features and possibilities for our limited requirements. I have no experience with Paint.NET so I am asking you. I have some experience with GIMP and found that GIMP is way too complicated for this purpose.

I'd like to hear comments from fellow forum members, whether or not you think that our normal office staff would be overwhelmed by Paint.NET just to annotate a screenshot.

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Thank you for the fast response. I'm quite sure that Paint.NET has no limitations and that it can do all we need.

But I am concerned that it is too much; too many features and possibilities for our limited requirements. I have no experience with Paint.NET so I am asking you. I have some experience with GIMP and found that GIMP is way too complicated for this purpose.

I'd like to hear comments from fellow forum members, whether or not you think that our normal office staff would be overwhelmed by Paint.NET just to annotate a screenshot.

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Paint.NET will be much better than GIMP in that regard, that's for sure. The name of the game here is "usability." It has been designed to be easy to use. Paint.NET is more powerful than what you'll be using it for, but you won't be overwhelmed by extra features.

EDIT: A worry I might consider: if the past is any indication, Windows XP support may be removed from Paint.NET when Windows 7 is released. Your office should really consider upgrading to 7, rather than XP. You'll have a much longer support cycle and a better program, as well as being able to use Paint.NET even longer!

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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Paint.NET will be much better than GIMP in that regard, that's for sure. The name of the game here is "usability." It has been designed to be easy to use. Paint.NET is more powerful than what you'll be using it for, but you won't be overwhelmed by extra features.

EDIT: A worry I might consider: if the past is any indication, Windows XP support may be removed from Paint.NET when Windows 7 is released. Your office should really consider upgrading to 7, rather than XP. You'll have a much longer support cycle and a better program, as well as being able to use Paint.NET even longer!

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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Paint.NET ... has been designed to be easy to use. Paint.NET is more powerful than what you'll be using it for, but you won't be overwhelmed by extra features.

This is excellent news, thank you very much!

Your office should really consider upgrading to 7, rather than XP.

I agree with you. Seeing how we're still using Win2000 as the standard platform today, anything newer than XP is completely out of the question... unfortunately. But at home I'm a longtime XP user, so it'll be good to finally upgrade at work, too.

Thank you for your excellent answers!

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Paint.NET ... has been designed to be easy to use. Paint.NET is more powerful than what you'll be using it for, but you won't be overwhelmed by extra features.

This is excellent news, thank you very much!

Your office should really consider upgrading to 7, rather than XP.

I agree with you. Seeing how we're still using Win2000 as the standard platform today, anything newer than XP is completely out of the question... unfortunately. But at home I'm a longtime XP user, so it'll be good to finally upgrade at work, too.

Thank you for your excellent answers!

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EDIT: A worry I might consider: if the past is any indication, Windows XP support may be removed from Paint.NET when Windows 7 is released. Your office should really consider upgrading to 7, rather than XP. You'll have a much longer support cycle and a better program, as well as being able to use Paint.NET even longer!

But isn't Paint.NET support more dependant on .NET support over OS support?

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Yes, we reviewed it and it gets close. Thanks for the suggestion!

But apparently it doesn't get triggered by the PrtScrn key, and there were some rather odd behaviour of the editing tools (the selection rectangle makes a copy of the bitmap which you can move around in a layer over the original bitmap but underneath the annotations... that was rather confusing). Anyway, the prtScrn key is essential.

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EDIT: A worry I might consider: if the past is any indication, Windows XP support may be removed from Paint.NET when Windows 7 is released.

Says who?

Your office should really consider upgrading to 7, rather than XP.

Although I can agree with that. Not that I'm biased or anything ...*

* yes I am. I work for Microsoft!

The Paint.NET Blog: https://blog.getpaint.net/

Donations are always appreciated! https://www.getpaint.net/donate.html

forumSig_bmwE60.jpg

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EDIT: A worry I might consider: if the past is any indication, Windows XP support may be removed from Paint.NET when Windows 7 is released.

Says who?

Extrapolation. Not long after Vista made its debut, you ended W2K support. I'm sure you're planning on dropping WXP support eventually, no?

 

The Doctor: There was a goblin, or a trickster, or a warrior... A nameless, terrible thing, soaked in the blood of a billion galaxies. The most feared being in all the cosmos. And nothing could stop it, or hold it, or reason with it. One day it would just drop out of the sky and tear down your world.
Amy: But how did it end up in there?
The Doctor: You know fairy tales. A good wizard tricked it.
River Song: I hate good wizards in fairy tales; they always turn out to be him.

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