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Hannah Prower

Making Backgrounds of Images Transparent

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Thanks for the useful info guys. The only thing that remains to be seen is if a .png can be used in the same way as a .jpg in my video editing sofware. What I mean by backgrounds for my home movies is background images for title screens or the disc menu. Well there's only one way to find out - give it a try. Thanks again. Glynn.

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Just done a quick check with my video editing software. I did a quick graphic with PDN which was made up of a graduated coloured background and with a .png image on a seperate layer. The graphic was flattened and saved as a .png and imported into the video editing software with no problems. I then rendered it as an mpg, again with no problems so the answer to my post above appears to be 'yes'.

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I dont know if someone has already said this, but you can use the magic wand and then push the "delete" key on oyur keyboard, I find it faster :)

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thanks, everything helped, but when im pasting my "transparent" pic, it's not letting me get rid of the checker board, so it's just the picture in the regular background... can someone help me?

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Okay, is there any way to copy that image and paste it into a new one, with out the checkered background, or when I save that image will it go away?

The checkerboard background is simply your visual clue that that area is transparent. That is only for when you have the image in Paint.NET. Once you save it as a GIF or PNG that checkerboard pattern will not be there.

Same for when you copy and paste.

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First of all, it looks like that tut goes straight from 1 to 4, second, it seems to me like step 6 is just saying what to save it as. A simple "remember to save it as [insert file format here]!" would have sufficed. And thanks for the tut. That's one less thing I need to find out to make sprite comics in PDN.

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It's a really simple tutorial aimed to first beginners, and the missing steps where deleted because someone suggested a faster method than the one which was proposed.

edit:typo

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Okay, is there any way to copy that image and paste it into a new one, with out the checkered background, or when I save that image will it go away?

The checkerboard background is simply your visual clue that that area is transparent. That is only for when you have the image in Paint.NET. Once you save it as a GIF or PNG that checkerboard pattern will not be there.

Same for when you copy and paste.

When I copy and paste it, the checkered background is still there?

Or does that just show up in paint?

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Okay, is there any way to copy that image and paste it into a new one, with out the checkered background, or when I save that image will it go away?

The checkerboard background is simply your visual clue that that area is transparent. That is only for when you have the image in Paint.NET. Once you save it as a GIF or PNG that checkerboard pattern will not be there.

Same for when you copy and paste.

When I copy and paste it, the checkered background is still there?

Or does that just show up in paint?

Anywhere there is transparency that goes all the way through the background image, or if the only layer you have is the background and you make a portion of it transparent, you will see the checkerboard.

The checkerboard is simply there to let you know "this area is completely transparent."

If you take your image with checkerboard showing and paste it on to a layer that sits atop another layer without any transparency, you will see that everywhere you saw checkerboard, you now see the lower layer showing through.

Not trying to be abrasive or condecending, but, do you need some pictures to help you understand the concept?

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Apparently I do need pictures.

I still dont understand.

I'm new at this.

Please bear with me...

Don't worry about it. We're glad to help. Here's the thing - the checkerboard isn't real.

See, Paint.NET uses layers to designate the different parts of the image. You can visualize them as a stack of transparencies, all on top of each other, with a piece of the image on each one. Now, underneath the stack is this checkerboard pattern. If you can see it, that means that there's nothing in its way.

Take this image, for example. There are three layers: The red square, the blue circle, and the green square. As you can see, there is a circle cut through the middle of all three.

simpleshapes.png

Now, imagine that I can go in and look at the whole thing from the side.

Can you see how the checkerboard basically just forms the "table" that you're setting the pieces of the image on?

simpleshapes-sideways.png

When you save it, you leave the checkerboard - the "table" - behind. You can also place an additional piece in between the red square and the "table".

Does that help?

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Apparently I do need pictures.

I still dont understand.

I'm new at this.

Please bear with me...

Being new to something is no sin. The only reason I know the little I know is because I've used other programs before.

Okay, here goes:

Start out with an image --

transparency1.png

Use the :MagicWandTool: MagicWand to select an area --

transparency2.png

And then delete the selection --

transparency3.png

Notice the dreaded 'checkerboard' has now reared it's ugly head.

Open a new image in PDN, copy it (or part of it, whatever), and paste it as a new layer in your original image --

New Image:

transparency4.png

After the copy/paste stuff:

transparency5.png

Now, deselect everything and drop your newly pasted in 'Layer 2' to the bottom of the layer stack (Background should now be on top of 'Layer 2'). Note that some of the areas where there was 'checkerboard' are now occluded and that the bottom 'Layer 2' shows through the cutout portions of the oiginal image. --

transparency6.png

If you flatten this image and save it as a .png and then open it any any browser but IE, you will see that all of the areas where the 'checkerboard' was present is now simply transparent and only the actual colored areas of the picture are seen.

transparency7.png

See the image above.

[edit] -- Crud. I was a bit behind David in getting this post up. I'll delete it if so desired.

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trooper, I think your tutorial adds something.

It's like part one and part two.

Thanks. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't repeatedly striking the proverbial deceased equine.

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