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Split Color and Brightness


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Split Color and Brightness allows the user to create a Color layer and a Brightness layer that produce the original image when blended using the selected blending mode. It's in the Color menu.

 

The DLL: SplitColorAndBrightness.zip

 

The Help menu:

Quote

Split Color and Brightness allows the user to create a Color layer and a Brightness layer that produce the original image when blended using the selected blending mode. Each of the blending modes is commutative, so the Color layer and the Brightness layer can be in either stacking order. Though this effect generally preserves transparency, it is intended to be used on opaque images. For partially-transparent pixels, neither the exact color nor the exact transparency of the original image will be produced when blending the Color and Brightness layers.

 

The controls are:

 

Display: Selects the image to display. The choices are Color and Brightness.

 

Blending Mode: Selects the blending mode to be used to combine the layers. The choices are Additive, Multiply, and Screen.

 

Transparent Background: Specifies that the background color should be made transparent.

 

For the Multiply blending mode the background color is white, and for the Screen blending mode the background color is black. Those are the colors which produce no change when blended with another color. When the Transparent Background option is enabled, the background color is effectively removed from the color. The color is made increasingly transparent in proportion to the degree to which it contains the background color.

 

When this option is enabled and Color is displayed, all colors that are not fully transparent will have at least one red, green, or blue color component that is 255, and at least one that is zero.

 

When this option is enabled and Brightness is displayed, all colors will be black for the Multiply blending mode, and white for the Screen blending mode,

 

This option is not compatible with the Additive blending mode, and is therefore disabled when it is selected.

 

 

The user interface:

Split-Color-and-Brightness-UI.png

This was somewhat inspired (if I can use so grand a term) by a method of painting -- sometimes referred to as grisaille -- in which a grayscale underpainting is glazed with color to produce a colored image.

 

Though this effect may not be especially useful, I think there are interesting possibilities of splitting the color and brightness, then applying separate modifications.

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