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Should I save PNGs with interlacing or non interlaced?


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I'm not the most well rounded when it comes to graphic design and stuff like this and would to know more; I know that PNGs are higher quality than JPGs and I want the highest quality PNGs I can get. When I go to save a PNG it gives me the options bit depth, dithering level, and transparency threshold. I looked at old threads on this forum and people just said to leave it at auto detect, 7, and 128 but I didn't find anything about checking the interlaced option box. Should I keep it unchecked or checked? Thanks

image.png.f2c9f78881cb45725b935d56e2cee9a2.png

Edited by tristanyc
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Interlacing doesn't affect the quality. It just changes the way the image data is stored within the file, and thus, how the data is loaded.

 

These days, with fast internet speeds, the image will load so quickly that you probably won't notice any difference between the two.

And if you're not even using your image on the web, who cares? The choice is non-consequential.

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10 minutes ago, toe_head2001 said:

Interlacing doesn't affect the quality. It just changes the way the image data is stored within the file, and thus, how the data is loaded.

 

These days, with fast internet speeds, the image will load so quickly that you probably won't notice any difference between the two.

And if you're not even using your image on the web, who cares? The choice is non-consequential.

ah ok thanks for explaining, ill just leave it off since thats the default. thanks again

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  • 1 year later...
On 2/26/2021 at 3:50 PM, toe_head2001 said:

Interlacing doesn't affect the quality. It just changes the way the image data is stored within the file, and thus, how the data is loaded.

 

These days, with fast internet speeds, the image will load so quickly that you probably won't notice any difference between the two.

And if you're not even using your image on the web, who cares? The choice is non-consequential.

What if you are using it on the web, or if you have a slow internet connection? Should you use interlacing then? And what does it actually do? I think it loads a lower quality version of the image before replacing it with the proper one, but I'm not sure.

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I think after more than a year we can consider this one closed. If you wish to restart the discussion please start a new thread.

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