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Joe

editing at pixel level

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Hello everyone

I think I am missing something - it is much, much easier to edit pixels on my old camera's images than from my new camera, although my new camera has 7.1 megapixels and the old one has only 3.3. My old camera is an Olympus C3000z; Image Resolution 275 x 625 pixels.

My new camera is an Olympus mu 700; Image Resolution 3072 x 2304 pixels.

I thought the new camera's higher resolution would make for even sharper images at pixel level. If anyone is able to enlighten me, I would appreciate it.

Joe

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Just a theory.

I just bought an Olympus sp-550 and I really don't know anything about the models you have.

In the camera menu under image quality, any resolution setting you choose can be set for normal or high quality. Take a pic at normal and the same pic at high quality and check it at the pixel level, sounds like it's worth a try.

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Resolution just refers to the number of pixels used. I don't know what your question is, but higher resolution just means it will look better when zoomed out.

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...the old one has only 3.3. My old camera is an Olympus C3000z; Image Resolution 275 x 625 pixels.
You see, that's quite funny, in that your 3.3 megapixel camera produces smaller images than my 3.2 mobile phone (cell phone) camera, which snaps pictures at 2048x1536.
I thought the new camera's higher resolution would make for even sharper images at pixel level.
Not really. All a higher resolution will do is create larger sized photos. Bear in mind also, that with larger sized images comes greater opportunity to see the defects of the image, such as the slightest movement when capturing the photo. For all you know, the lack of 'sharpness' is due to human-error. But essentially you're zooming in to the pixel level of a huge image, therefore everything will appear bigger and you will loose the coherency of the picture. Whereas with a smaller image, you can zoom in and still have it 'retain' its form - this harkens to Simon's response: there are less pixels to deal with.

David is quite correct with his response, too; take note of it.

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...the old one has only 3.3. My old camera is an Olympus C3000z; Image Resolution 275 x 625 pixels.
You see, that's quite funny, in that your 3.3 megapixel camera produces smaller images than my 3.2 mobile phone (cell phone) camera, which snaps pictures at 2048x1536.

Unless you normally take photos in different formats, frommy experience most cameras use JPEG, but many can also take RAW and TIFFs, for example.

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Thanks everyone - all your replies makes sense to me. Now that I have discovered how to erase wrinkles at pixel level, I was having a field day with my old camera's images. I just can't get that precision with my new one. But I understand now that less pixels is not necessarily a bad thing. One last question - I am thinking of buying a Veho neg scanner to upload my 35mm negs as it has good reviews, but I don't want to make another costly mistake. Does anyone know if pixel editing is feasable with the Veho? Once again, any help is much appreciated...

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A scanner turns a "hardcopy" into an image which will have all the pixel data in the resultant file. So yes, you can edit the results. Provided the scanner outputs the image in a suitable file format (and not some strange "this model only" format).

Look for file-save options that include *.GIF and *.JPG file formats (there are many others, but these two are common) and you will be able to load the images into PDN and play with them to your hearts content.

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