kashif126

Do you love photography?

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You did not mention your ISO setting for the shot. I should be between 200-400 to keep data noise down.

 

Note:

I just read that some photographers are shoot at an ISO of 1 to get those wispy water shots

 

Edited by HyReZ
to add more nfo

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Uh... my iPhone doesn't have all those settings... :( 

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@TrevorOutlaw  Those pictures are beautiful!  I've been along the Blue Ridge Parkway and some of the vistas are absolutely stunning!  <3

 

When you're high up and looking down into the valleys you feel like you're on top of the world.  :)

 

9 hours ago, BoltBait said:

Uh... my iPhone doesn't have all those settings... :(

 

:lol: :lol:

 

  • Upvote 1

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I happened across this video link this morning. It is about colorizing vintage photos and methods for making the colorizations look authentic:

 

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16 hours ago, BoltBait said:

Uh... my iPhone doesn't have all those settings... :( 


Check this out:

How to get long exposures, and beautiful images of flowing water, on just an iPhone
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/11/15/how-get-long-long-exposures-iphone/858794001/

 

6 Advanced iPhone Camera Controls For Jaw-Dropping Photographs

https://iphonephotographyschool.com/iphone-camera-controls/

 

 

Edited by HyReZ

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19 hours ago, HyReZ said:

You did not mention your ISO setting for the shot. I should be between 200-400 to keep data noise down.

 

 

If you were referring to the photograph BoltBait was inquiring about, I checked the EXIF data and it doesn't mention it.  I think it was either 400 or 800, can't remember, because the ND filter was lowering the amount of light hitting the sensor, forcing me to go up in the ISO.

 

@BoltBait I also seem to recall tweaking with the saturation setting, although I am not certain, and I almost always set the camera to take picture in vivid mode.

 

This website is an excellent resource to learn some tips, technique, and tutorials on getting the most out of the camera.  https://www.picturecorrect.com/

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8 hours ago, lynxster4 said:

@TrevorOutlaw  Those pictures are beautiful!  I've been along the Blue Ridge Parkway and some of the vistas are absolutely stunning!  <3

 

When you're high up and looking down into the valleys you feel like you're on top of the world.  :)

 

 

:lol: :lol:

 

 

The wife and I once camped at Rocky Knob, and we woke up the next morning and went to an overlook.  WOW! To see the fog completely blanket the valley below the mountain was surreal and no matter how I tried, I couldn't adequately capture it with my camera.  You just had to be there to see it.

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5 hours ago, TrevorOutlaw said:

 

If you were referring to the photograph BoltBait was inquiring about, I checked the EXIF data and it doesn't mention it.  I think it was either 400 or 800, can't remember, because the ND filter was lowering the amount of light hitting the sensor, forcing me to go up in the ISO.


I am not aware of what app you are using to read the EXIF data, but on every digital photo that I have taken ( from five different cameras -Kodak/Panasonic/Olympus/Lumia 950/Galaxy 6 ) when I right click on the image icon and select Properties/Details, I get quite a bit of meta-data, including the ISO number.

Edited by HyReZ

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You guys have got a great eye and talent.   A pleasure to view your photos

 

I'm interested in getting into photography to go HERE which is just a few miles up the road.

Any suggestions on decent entry/ above entry level of cameras for a beginner who would have a lot to learn ?

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Entry level is subjective thing.
When I started learning photography and film & print processing; this was my first camera in the mid 1960s:
Diana_camera.jpg

 

Today the pocket and phone cameras can be used to learn the basics and some of the pocket cameras have 40x optical zoom.
In the the 1970s I got a SLR film camera that is featured in a graphic that I posted to this thread earlier.
 I have never owned a

DSLR so I can't extol its virtue. I currently use bridge cameras and micro four thirds cameras.

Here is a link to entry level cameras:
https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/buying-guides/best-camera-for-beginners-best-entry-level-dslr-mirrorless-and-compact-cameras

 

Edited by HyReZ
to add more nfo

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11 hours ago, welshblue said:

You guys have got a great eye and talent.   A pleasure to view your photos

 

I'm interested in getting into photography to go HERE which is just a few miles up the road.

Any suggestions on decent entry/ above entry level of cameras for a beginner who would have a lot to learn ?

 

Thanks for the feedback.

 

It generally depends on what you want to do with your camera.  One reason I finally bit the bullet and bought a DSLR, a Nikon D3100, was because I wanted to learn how to shoot those silky smooth waterfall, to have camera that creates a bokeh background while shooting the object, and to have greater control over aperture and shutter.  I owned about three different models of point-and-shoot digital camera, but they always left me unsatisfied, especially when I wanted to take macro photography or nature photography.

 

You could start out by buying a stock DSLR in your store, it often comes with lens, and then spend some time learning the controls of the camera.  YouTube have plenty of tutorials on the model you choose.  I remember you saying that you have shaky hands, so I would invest in a sturdy tripod, a shutter remote (I use a wireless one) since more DSLR are shipped with image stabilizer software built-in.  That link you showed a lot of aircraft in the shot, and I am willing to bet those photographers used shutter priority in order to capture high speed motion.  Nikon and Canon are popular brand and you can't go wrong with either.  It depends on your bank account and how much you are willing to invest the time, energy, and money into learning how to take pictures.

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Yes, I used my canon 70-300 mm lens at the full 300 mm @ F 5.6 to get the shallow DOF (depth of field). I shot in RAW and tweaked it a bit in DarkTable. It's an old camera now, but she still gets great shots now and then.

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My favorite camera is my Olympus PEN E-PL1. It is a micro four thirds camera, so it is very compact but is able to use a variety of lenses from several manufactures, designed for that format. With the proper adapter, I can even use the lenses from my other Olympus film cameras in the manual focus mode. Because of the micro four thirds format it has a small MOS sensor so most cameras of this format are ~14 megapixels. There are more cameras around now that do not have reflex (moving mirror) mechanism, but does have the larger sensor of 24.3 megapixels. Sony and now Canon have great products in that format.

I also use my Panasonic Lumix FX70 bridge camera. I think the bridge is suppose to move the user over to a DSLR 🙂
I use it when I need to have one camera that can go from 20mm - 1200mm (60x optical zoom) and shoot 1080p HD.
I have retired all of my camcorders because of this.

Even with My Microsoft Lumia 950 phone I have a 20 megapixel 26mm camera with 6 element lens and auto focus with manual over-ride.
I put in a 128 GB micro SD card when I went to Alaska, just to shoot 2160p video at 30fps HD.

Edited by HyReZ
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Here is a composited image I did with a photo I had taken of my nieces dog Winter back in September of 2017:
Winter_Storm_Trooper_02.jpg

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On 2/6/2019 at 6:46 PM, HyReZ said:

Entry level is subjective thing

 

On 2/6/2019 at 9:41 PM, TrevorOutlaw said:

It generally depends on what you want to do with your camera

 

Basically I want a camera that's pretty idiot proof but still good enough to capture fighter jets from below at roughly 200 ft and from above it's something like 100ft in places.

Also I follow a lot of Rallying so in principle both the same except one is in the air flying @ 300 mph and the other on the floor @ 120 mph

 

Some people don't agree but we're lucky enough to live in an area they use to practice low flying ... a bit disconcerting when you're travelling along and a fighter plane suddenly appears straight in front of you.  Worse when they come behind you and the first thing you hear is the noise.  Years later I still except the Hercules to drop out of the sky

 

Cost - depending how much I can hide, but say £400 - Time - I'm quite a perfectionist (not a good thing)so as long as it takes.  So much conflicting interest online on what is a good camera.    Guess the sensible thing to do is read a lot and take a walk and see what the plane enthusiasts are using/ pick their brains a bit

 

@dipstick - great shot

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