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Overwrite Blending Mode is not available


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I have installed 4.0.19, and it appears that Paint.NET does not support overwrite blending mode yet. Am I missing something here?

 

Additional Info below

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Application    paint.net 4.0.19 (Final 4.19.6484.39094)
Build Date    Monday, October 2, 2017
Install type    Classic
    
Hardware accelerated rendering (GPU)    True
Animations    True
DPI    96.00 (1.00x scale)
Language    en-US
    
OS    Windows 10 x64 (10.0.15063.0)
.NET Runtime    4.0.30319.42000
Physical Memory    32,678 MB
    
CPU    Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-6850K CPU @ 3.60GHz
    Speed    ~3598 MHz
    Cores / Threads    6 / 12
    Features    DEP, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4_1, SSE4_2, XSAVE
    
Video Card    NVIDIA Quadro K4200
    Dedicated Video RAM    4,062 MB
    Dedicated System RAM    0 MB
    Shared System RAM    16,339 MB
    Vendor ID    0x10DE
    Device ID    0x11B4
    Subsystem ID    0x109610DE
    Revision    161
    LUID    0x0000DFB1
    Flags    None
    Outputs    1
    
Video Card    Microsoft Basic Render Driver
    Dedicated Video RAM    0 MB
    Dedicated System RAM    0 MB
    Shared System RAM    16,339 MB
    Vendor ID    0x1414
    Device ID    0x008C
    Subsystem ID    0x00000000
    Revision    0
    LUID    0x0000E869
    Flags    Software
    Outputs    0

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Edited by Reptillian

G'MIC Filter Developer

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Just now, Reptillian said:

Judging from the screenshot, overwrite layer blending mode may be coming soon, right? Looks like overwrite is missing on just layer.

 

The Overwrite blending mode doesn't have any meaning when dealing with entire layers... only when working with tools.

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4 minutes ago, BoltBait said:

The Overwrite blending mode doesn't have any meaning when dealing with entire layers... only when working with tools.

 

Photoshop, and Krita have something similar to how overwrite behaves. In Krita 4.0.0 Pre-Alpha for example, it would be destination in. But, of course, to emulate the behavior exactly in Krita, you would have to apply filter mask and put Alpha Value to 1 on every pixel in the layer below the destination in layer. In Photoshop, it would be clipping mask going up or something (never tried it, but I know similar behavior to Krita destination in is there). I'm not really sure why you would say that overwrite blending mode does not have any meaning when dealing with entire layers, unless there is some issues to do with codes. So, why are the other blending modes are available for both?

 

Edited by Reptillian

G'MIC Filter Developer

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20 minutes ago, BoltBait said:

I tried Krita, it's garbage.

 

Anyway, if you want to make and use masks, we have plugins to help.

 

We both use Paint.NET and Krita very differently, and we both have different opinions about the two software, and I'll leave it there. I'll say that they're both useful for different things although I don't use Krita similar to most other Krita users. Some people like one software, other people hate other software. Just how life goes.

 

And now, I think I know why overwrite blending mode isn't supported on layers. Something to do with colors. When alpha is at 0, is there any color in there? It wouldn't make sense. Something like Krita Destination In, and GIMP layer mask would be great for this software. I use GIMP 2.8 for niche usage, and layer mask in Paint.NET would make switch from GIMP 2.8 to Paint.NET for niche use. To clarify, I never once saved as .xcf format or .pdn this year, but I use these softwares to copy and paste and export with very limited amount of editing which has to do with clipboard.

Edited by Reptillian

G'MIC Filter Developer

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Overwrite isn't supported on layers because it would require an additional alpha channel. That's how the Shapes tool (and others) support it: internally, they have two alpha channels for the content they are rendering. One defines the transparency for the pixel, the other defines the coverage for the pixel. The latter defines, in a sense, which pixels are affected by the rendering.

 

Let's say you want to use the Paintbrush tool as an eraser. So you set the Alpha to 0 (in the Colors window), and the blending mode to Overwrite. You also disable antialiasing, just to keep this discussion simpler. The brush will stamp out pixels that have Alpha=0, Coverage=255. Outside the brush's stamp we'll have Alpha=0, Coverage=0. The former will then set pixels on the layer so that Alpha=0. The latter pixels will be skipped over and leave the layer alone.

 

Like you said, what you want are layer masks, which is what Photoshop calls it and is just a different name for what you want.

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I appreciate your indepth explanation, and now I know a little bit more of how Paint.NET works. On the part of layer mask, I guess either terminologies works (transparency mask, and layer mask). Transparency mask works better in case of programs with more than just transparency mask just that users of those program don't get confused between layer mask, and other mask types.

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