HurryK

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About HurryK

  1. It's supposed to make a posterize effect on the mid levels after blurring, giving the overal image a somewhat painted look. Admittetly, the cartoonize effect is far from perfect. you can view intermediate results by simply returning the mid variable: return mid; or commenting out some of the effect lines using the // and press apply.
  2. Ah, I think I know why it crashed, something I forgot to mention. Please make sure to also put the 'PDNScriptor.txt' contained in the zip file in the Paint.Net\Effects folder together with the plugin. I'll fix this issue in the next version. Note that some of the example functions use 3rd party effects, like Ed Harvey Effects v 3.5 (2012-02-13).If you don't have it plugged in, it still shouldn't crash and just give a compile error. The plugin comes with a set of examples, you can select it from the dropdown menu at the of the dialog. The most basic function would be: function NoEffect() { return source; } this simply returns the source image. see if you are able to apply it correctly without problems. Then, the invert effect. function JustInvertIt() { var dst = source.InvertColors(); return dst; } This will apply the invert color filter. and then a combination: function InvertBlur() { var blur = source.GaussianBlur(20); var dst = blur.InvertColors(); return dst; } Let me know if it worked. thanks, Herre
  3. hi, I'm not familiar with those tools. Creating paths is difficult since Paint.Net allows only limited access to the image object (e.g. you can't access any layers from a plugin). However you could create masks, and only apply effects to the masked image. Any feedback, requests or comments on the plugin and its use are welcome.
  4. Download: PDNScriptor_v0.9.zip Personally I'm more of a coder than a graphics artist. Messing around with blending layers together and using filters got me frustrated because I always forget what I did in which order. I figured that being able to express the blending and filtering operations in a script would make it easy to remember and tweak. So I developerd the Paint.Net Scriptor plugin, just to see if it was possible. The script looks something like this: Result before/after: Paint.Net Scriptor allows you to write composite effect scripts in a javascript-like-language that can be reused and shared with others. Scriptor allows you to split up the original image into its composite parts, apply effects on each separate part and blend them together again into a new image. This is an alternative way to work with layers in order to blend images together. See the help page for more information Note for version 0.9. when you install this plugin make sure you also copy the PDNScriptor.txt contained in the zip file in the Paint.Net\Effects folder.